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Asma Moheet Feb 25
Female intensivists are at higher risk for burnout. Conflict with nurses and MD colleagues contributes to intensivist burnout. It is importantly foster a good work environment and work on team dynamics.
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CVCSCCM Feb 25
Here are some actual strategies to : Does your workplace value wellness as a “metric” (formal or informal)?
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Sarah monchar Feb 25
Thank you for bringing this issue to light. We need to eliminate the burnout by removing the perceived hierarchy and building social connections.
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Clinical Ethics Department Feb 25
Nothing like a good visual to help drive the point home that burnout is an epidemic for critical care. Time to really
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Matt Korobey Feb 25
Burnout has REAL impact on provides of care, an impact that reaches patients
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Jessica Bunin Feb 25
Healthy work environment: authentic leadership, meaningful recognition, effective decision making, real collaboration, skilled communication, appropriate staffing. Yes, please!!!
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Neha Dangayach Feb 25
Audience ques: What paradigms do we need to change? Marc Moss: there are “no caps” for Attendings. The amount of work has increased, taking to administration so we get the support we need. Dealing with death and dying instead of suppressing how we feel.
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MeadowNP Feb 25
Contagion: one BURNED OUT apple can ruin the bunch. We need to all have empathy for our colleagues and raise them up to improve our unit morale, therefore decreasing further spread of the Burnout.
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Sarah monchar Feb 25
"Burn out" cannot have a negative connotation...it is a reality, not a failure. We need to support our burned out providers not turn them away
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Intensivist Feb 25
I was burning out,and I didn’t know! Interesting perspective.
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Tina Shah Dec 1
This man is the first person to make a compelling case of adding a musician to the ICU team. New ideas like this is how we
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Clinical Ethics Department Feb 25
Here are common factors that lead to burnout.
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Frantz Feb 25
Stopping burnout when the administration fails to support you with adequate staffing is doomed to fail
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Lakshman Swamy Feb 25
The most important reason that burnout matters is that it absolutely impacts the patient, as described so clearly by
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SCCM Dec 1
Thanks to the faculty and attendees for participating in the CCSC summit. 100% attendance today - everyone we invited is here, plus some extras. This topic is at a tipping point in critical care.
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Clinical Ethics Department Dec 1
Knowing the risk factors for burnout is optimal to working on dealing with it. We have a starting list!
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Erika L Setliff Feb 25
The call to action to mitigate is on each of us as we engage at personal, peer-to-peer, and system levels to promote health and resiliency.
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MeadowNP Feb 25
Safety in the ICU...locked units? security? How do we stay safe at work when we have an active threat?
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Tony Gerlach Apr 12
The roots of burn-out, boreout and compassion fatigue lie in people’s need to believe that their lives are meaningful, that the things they do are important, make sense and give existential signifcance.
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Eddy Joe Feb 25
Before we , can we focus on stopping ICU freezeout in this conference? Brrrrrr! ❄️☃️
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