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David Newhouse Aug 11
The people of Kashechewan have been evacuated 12 times since 2004 due to flooding or the risk of flooding of the Albany River.
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Cole Burston Aug 10
Canadian waters are estimated to hold billions of barrels of recoverable oil. But Is oil money worth risking a way of life?
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TorontoStar Aug 15
Today, Trudeau is in New Brunswick discussing the floods as the result of a 'climate crisis.' took into how the province has gone through back-to-back, record-breaking floods that has destroyed homes and devastated towns
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TorontoStar Jul 24
Replying to @TorontoStar
To read more on our series, what you can do to help the environment, and more, head to the menu here:
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Kelly Husack Jul 26
farmers are on the front lines of . They will tell you that things are not longer the same and that proper land management is the crux of their existence.
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TorontoStar Jul 19
Today, Ontario and Quebec are under a heat warning. Last July was the hottest Montreal has experienced in 97 years. During the heatwave, hospitalizations almost doubled. Public health officials recorded 66 heat-related deaths.
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TorontoStar Aug 15
"With 3 major floods over the past 11 years, people in Fredericton and the surrounding area have faced the impacts & costs of the climate crisis first hand," said this morning in New Brunswick. Read our full feature in :
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TorontoStar Jul 24
Replying to @TorontoStar
Other projections are just as frightening. Temperatures will rise. Precipitation will change. Permafrost will continue to thaw. This is the projected temperature increases in Canada over the next 90 years.
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TorontoStar Jul 12
It's clear that in Canada, like the rest of the world, we're facing a climate crisis. We have a handbook of what you can eat, how to save energy to help the planet. The final part in our series.
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TorontoStar Jul 2
They tried to save the caribou by forcing out the people who cared for them. The Sayisi Dene, who in 1956 were given only hours to pack, relocate. 'This move destroyed our traditional livelihood... it 'had the same effect as genocide.'
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Hannah Bell 🇨🇦💚 Jun 13
Over the next 90 years, more than 1,000 buildings, 50 kilometres of roads and one wind turbine on P.E.I. could disappear or sustain damage because of erosion.
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TorontoStar Jul 4
“Nature’s freezer” is thawing and a warming climate is wreaking havoc in Canada’s Arctic. It's also affecting the ways of life of Indigenous peoples
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TorontoStar Jul 4
As permafrost warms up, Canada's Arctic is getting softer. The effects are dramatic — pipes cracking, costing hundreds of thousands of dollars to fix. It's also profoundly affecting the ways of life of Indigenous peoples. in Nunavut.
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Ainslie Cruickshank Jun 3
“Alberta has always had fires. But as the planet warms and the global climate shifts, wildfires are becoming bigger, more intense, more destructive and more frequent.” The latest story is all about , must read from
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The Star Calgary Jul 17
The effects of a warmer climate are, and will continue to be, felt in every facet of Canadian society. Here are ten takeaways from the Star's 16-part series:
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TorontoStar Jul 26
As the planet warms and the global climate shifts, wildfires are becoming bigger, more intense, more destructive and more frequent. Alberta won't stop burning. Neither will Ontario.
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Dave 🇨🇦 Jul 21
To start a wildfire, three key ingredients are needed: dry, hot and windy weather, fuel to burn and a spark. Climate change contributes to all of them.
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MUN Geography Jun 28
Compelling story on coastal erosion, Red Bay, climate change, and Parks Canada, with input from Geography's Norm Catto
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TorontoStar Jul 17
16 stories, across Canada, on the effects of climate change to the nation. From floods, to melting arctic, to disappearing land, these are the 10 key takeaways from to remember.
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TorontoStar Jul 3
Toronto’s ninja storm last August flooded roads, stranded streetcars and trapped two men in a rapidly filling elevator. Rising temperatures that accompany climate change can increase the odds of intense rainfall that leads to flooding.
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