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Audubon Society Dec 5
There are 300 million fewer seabirds today than there were in 1950. Species such as Black Skimmers rely on fish to survive, but they often can’t find enough to eat. Stand up for the Forage Fish Conservation Act today:
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Chellie Pingree Aug 12
In the 1970s, began Project Puffin, the world’s first-ever restored puffin colony—right here in the Gulf of Maine! I’m honored to be the first member of Congress to visit Eastern Egg Rock and witness their five decades of research to .
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Audubon Washington Aug 8
Thank you for meeting with us to discuss ways to conserve forage fish and
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Audubon Society Nov 22
Every winter, Atlantic Puffins head out to the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument. recently found lots of rare ocean creatures that also share this special place.
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Audubon Society Dec 5
As the UN summit is underway, we need to protect seabirds and the tiny fish they rely on. In a warming ocean, seabirds spend more energy looking for food to feed their chicks.
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Audubon Society Oct 16
Seabirds like Atlantic Puffins & Least Terns rely on Atlantic herring as their primary food source. Take action today to support plans to better conserve these fish and ensure seabirds have enough food into the future:
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Audubon Society Oct 16
Climate change impacts forage fish—the food seabirds need. Thanks & for the Climate-Ready Fisheries Act of 2019 to understand climate impacts to fish and what that means for management.
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Robb Edwards Ⓥ Sep 5
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Project Puffin Nov 16
Now is the time to speak up for Puffins!
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Audubon Florida May 23
Good news: Florida's and are working on passing legislation to safeguard forage fish—vital prey for seabirds, sport and commercial fish and other wildlife. Take action now:
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Don Lyons Nov 16
Here's an opportunity to help fish and the seabirds that rely on them!
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Audubon California Sep 26
Seabirds populations have declined 70% since 1950. Ocean warming causes oxygen and plankton declines, which are crucial to seabirds’ main prey: for­age fish.
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Lindsey Lanpher Oct 3
F-Trump. Save fish-eating birds by protecting forage fish today! Take action with .
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Project Puffin Apr 23
In case you missed this post, we thought we would share it with you! Please help us to 🙂
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Audubon California Apr 10
One of the best ways to help seabirds is to protect the small fish they need for food. We're pushing a new bill in Congress that does just that.
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Seattle Audubon Aug 15
Our is the Rhinoceros Auklet. As most of their diet is made up of small fish, the health of West Coast fisheries is critical to their survival. Take action with to
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Don Lyons Nov 2
A fun science question to ponder, but I am usually so struck by the unique beauty of murre eggs that I forget all about the shape!
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Walker Golder Apr 24
One of the most important things we can do for marine wildlife and fisheries.
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Audubon Pennsylvania Jun 5
During Capitol Hill Ocean Week, we thank & for championing legislation that will help strengthen our ocean ecosystem and protect seabirds' primary food source: forage fish.
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Pew Environment Apr 10
Across the aisle and across the country, there’s support for improving conservation of forage fish. We are excited that and just introduced the Forage Fish Conservation Act.
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