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Shajeeshan Lingeswaran Jun 10
"Then proceeded to recalibrate the DICE-model damage function so that an optimal abatement plan would lead to the 2°C target." – Nordhaus (2014) How can you just change a damage function to reach a target? :O
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Arnab Oct 8
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Nico Bauer Oct 8
2 points on for : 1. he computed the global (!) social cost of carbon. 2. He used a computational (!) model based on economic theory. We can complain a lot about the details, but these things have been break throughs, and 1. is today a very important one.
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Matt Dobra Oct 8
So while the citation is for sustainability, I prefer his work on the Political Business Cycle, which suggests that politicians (of both parties) intentionally manipulate the economy to increase their election odds at the expense of long run growth.
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Dave Blomquist 9 May 18
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Ludovic Subran Oct 8
for goes to and and shows that and matter in macroeconomics 👏🏼
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Mitchell McGrath Jul 4
Some people missed the memo that I didn’t want to watch your shitty iPhone videos of fireworks I’ve already watched.
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Enrica De Cian Oct 8
To slow or not to slow? The economics of GHGs by William in 1991 is no longer a question, the question is how fast, says the new report. And we can say this thanks to the legacy of the model to the community.
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ICC Sweden Jan 24
One of the key points of model is that it’s cheaper for the society to do too much (in action) rather than fall behind by aiming at just enough, says Hassler
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Yann Giraud Oct 8
Let it be recorded here that BOTH and your humble servant predicted who would win the 2018 Prize. So now you know what years of experience in the history of recent economics business are useful for.
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Christian Odendahl Jun 17
Ok, Twitter, impress me: who is the next William ? (I mean the up and coming climate economists, preferably female)
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Tilman Brück Oct 8
Congratulations to and Bill for winning the in . Nordhaus is also an important contributor to the economics of , demonstrating how economics can help understand many aspects of human survival.
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Thieß Petersen Oct 19
: William and the costs of | VOX, CEPR Policy Portal
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Ann Pettifor Jul 1
In this case governments ignored scientists but listened to economists like
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Tom Fiddaman Oct 8
I hate to be contrarian, but think it's reasonable to wonder whether work has helped or hurt the cause of climate mitigation
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Miriam Berkley 19 Jan 15
Jean 's fine Interview with Mark , who discusses early life and parents
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Hogan Oct 8
~ INTRO TO "SUPPOSITORY & DEPOSITORY ECONOMICS" IN "WHITE C. POSSE" // Congrats on - Thou members in 80s of same tennis club I'm against carbon taxes.
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Chris Norley Oct 8
RT : BREAKING : The Royal Swedish Academy of awards the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Sciences in Memory of Alfred 2018 to William D. and Paul M. .
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Ethemcan Oct 9
Got in the mood with all the talk on and ? and I got you covered with a new full frontal critique on the politics of carbon market establishment in Turkey. Coming (pretty) soon.
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Asjad Naqvi Oct 8
and win the for climate change and technological change. So it means that (MIT) indirectly won it since he combined both their theories.
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