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#obsmuk 5m
5 minutes to the end of the chat. Please wrap up your discussions.
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Zaher Toumi MD 53m
Replying to @obsmuk
It is very difficult to spot a patient with fatty liver disease unless you have the formala: affected by =fatty liver disease. I do not screen my patients pre for
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Zaher Toumi MD 13m
Replying to @Wendy_Harri @obsmuk
I think so. If is the main treatment and is the most effective treatment then must play a significant role in the management of .
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#obsmuk 45m
A great discussion. Let us mover to Q2. How should patients with be treated/managed? What medications are useful/should be avoided in patients with NAFLD?
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#obsmuk 55m
Thank you everyone for joining us! Without delay let us discuss the first question. How to spot a patient with significant liver disease? Should all patients with obesity (or who undergo bariatric surgery) be screened/tested for
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#obsmuk 25m
A lot of interesting discussions! Let us discuss Q4 now. What is the role of different treatments in the management of patients with ?
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#obsmuk 44s
This is the official end of the chat! Thank you very much for your contributions. Thank you so much to for leading the chat! Please join us 4th Wednesday of every month.
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AASLD 5h
From : "Vinyl chloride-induced interaction of nonalcoholic and toxicant-associated steatohepatitis: Protection by the ALDH2 activator Alda-1"
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Zaher Toumi MD 39m
If third of the population is affected by and 70% of patients affected by obesity have , this might mean doing liver biopsies for fifth of the population.
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Paul 3m
Replying to @obsmuk
Thank you for an interesting chat. I have learnt a lot
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Journal of Hepatology 11h
In press | Prospective evaluation of a primary care referral pathway for patients with non-alcoholic disease
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#obsmuk 15m
Thank you for the great discussions! Keep it up for Q5. Among options, is there an option that is preferable in patients with Are there contraindications for bariatric surgery in patients with NAFLD?
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Nicolai Worm Apr 23
"...in normal weight, non-centrally obese men and women, the presence of fatty liver alone, and also fatty liver plus IR, increased risk of incident diabetes..."
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#obsmuk 35m
Brilliant! Time for Q3 How, and how frequently, should a patient with be monitored?
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Zaher Toumi MD 9m
Replying to @obsmuk
The following is mostly anecdotal. In patients with non- , any option is ok. With , I do sleeve.
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CGH Apr 23
The AGA Journals Blog reviews our May essential reading article on the effects of surgery on :
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Rebecca Grossman 51m
Replying to @ZaherToumi @obsmuk
How sensitive would serum LFTs be for detecting in the context of obesity? I would assume most patients would get screening bloods preoperatively.
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CGH Apr 22
Essential reading from our May issue: systematic review finds that surgery leads to resolution of in obese patients
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Zaher Toumi MD Apr 22
Current evidence suggests that bariatric surgery for patients with severe obesity decreases the grade of steatosis, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis in NAFLD. Should be utilised more in the management of patients with ? How can that be achieved?
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Ashwin Dhanda 22h
Congrats . Fantastic study getting all the press it deserves. is too big to manage without the help of our primary care colleagues
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