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Paul Byrne May 18
At 8:32 am Pacific time, May 18, 1980, it happened. exploded, producing the largest landslide ever recorded, sending a tower of rock and ash 19 km into the stratosphere, and killing 57. I've added the Empire State Building to this image for scale. A thread:
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Paul Byrne May 18
Talk about an "OH SHIT" moment. These astonishing photographs were taken by John "Jack" V. Christianson from atop Mt. Adams, 54 km due east of , and show his friend's reaction to watching that gigantic mountain just collapse. May 18, 1980.
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Miami Rick ✈️🇺🇸 May 29
As you descend via the HHOOD4 arrival into ’s , if you’re lucky to have good visibility, you are treated to an amazing up-close sight of on the left and and on the right! Gorgeous day to fly in !
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Michael Thomas Bogan May 18
Great thread on some of the human stories behind — the eruption is one of my earliest memories, it shook our house from 100 miles away
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Tom Banse May 13
I remember exactly where I was when blew her top. Can you believe it's been 40 years? Lots of events afoot to mark the milestone anniversary, but they're all virtual. Roads up to the mountain are closed:
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Howard Berkes May 18
40 years ago today, Mt St Helens scorched & flattened forests, buried valleys, blotted out the sun for 100's of miles & left 57 dead. My look back, with my reporting then and since.
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Tess van Straaten May 18
🌋 It was 40 years ago today that Mount St. Helens erupted, leaving a trail of destruction and sending a cloud of ash over For those that saw it, what do you remember?
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NOAA Satellites May 18
40 years ago, erupted in a massive blast that was famously visible from space. Here's the original imagery from 's GOES-3 🛰️. Learn more about this event and how continue to track eruptions around the world:
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Forest Service NW May 18
Celebrating - Beauties in the new landscape of the mountain.
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Austin Jenkins N3 May 17
Sunday Read: On May 18, 1980, I was a first grader on a school camping trip near . For the 40th anniversary, I reconnected with my former teacher, a fellow student and and parent chaperones to tell this story of our harrowing evacuation
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Kari Plog May 16
This is an incredible first-person account from about his experience evacuating Camp Cispus in Randle, Washington, the day erupted 40 years ago. Definitely worth your time. Wow.
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Justin Franz May 19
So many cool images of the last time masks were the hot new look in the Northwest
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PNSN May 6
The 1980 eruption of forever changed volcano monitoring. Join us May 18th on YouTube for "Mount St. Helens and the Cascade Range Volcanoes - The 40th Anniversary." Experts will discuss Cascadia tectonics, volcanoes, and changes since 1980.
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Phil Higuera May 18
Today is the 40th anniversary of the 1980 eruption of . One of the coolest things about coring lakes is seeing ash layers clearly preserved, as shows here in the upper sediments of Silver Lake, from northern Montana = !
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UW News May 14
Journalists: Taking a break from to write about the 40th anniversary of the eruption? We have a list of experts and resources to help: Also, is hosting a virtual event on Monday — more details on the page ⬇️
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WA History Museum May 18
40 years ago, Mount St. Helens blew, killing 57 people & thousands of animals. 540 million tons of ash fell over 22,000 square miles. WA was forever changed. Tune in at 6:30 this eve to hear stories from people who were there!
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NOAA Satellites - Public Affairs May 18
SPOTLIGHT: 40 years ago today, erupted with a huge , seen here from this GOES-3🛰️visible loop, which fell over 22,000 square miles of the . Learn how satellites monitor volcanoes from orbit here:
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WSU News May 4
ecologists John Bishop and Mark Swanson have been involved in long-term research for decades and are preparing for the next generation of work.
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Washington State Archives May 19
at : About 540 million tons of ash from the eruption fell over an area of more than 22,000 square miles making traveling difficult or impossible. WSDOT crews plowed volcanic ash from highways using snowplows, but most east-west highways remained closed.
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Anne Kasmar Jul 29
roadtrip reflections between & CraterLake: how much I love my Dad, who taught me to drive, my grandma who supported my off-road adventures, my Mom who taught me to protect myself and all those I have met along the way
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