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Florida Museum Aug 19
& clams: sclerochronology is like counting tree rings, but on shells (and things like coral, teeth & fish ear bones) to determine how successful that creature was while alive. Modern and fossil shells hold data on the ocean, climate & more:
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Simon Griffiths 19h
Caught in the act. For anyone that thought were ugly and expressionless, this is what happens when you walk in their sexy time. (because for me, every day is MolluscMonday!)
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MBARI Aug 19
Deep-sea drive, or should we say, dive-thru. 🍟
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Heather Leigh Aug 12
is my favorite day of the week.
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Carnegie Museum of Natural History Aug 12
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Christopher Mah Aug 19
Watching land snails eat in time lapse is impressive!
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Imogen Cavadino Aug 12
Interesting comments on how we need to agree to use the same terminology for the anatomy of mollusca for consistency... First we should agree on how to spell "Mollusc" 😉
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Alison Young Aug 19
Enjoy this lovely Hermissenda on this morning.
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DigAtlasAncientLife Aug 19
Happy ! This Cretaceous ammonite (Grossouvrites) from Antarctica shows amazing fractal-like details of one of its interior septal walls. From collections. Explore model on Sketchfab:
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Christopher Mah Aug 19
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Casey Richart Aug 19
It's so I'll share the beautiful embroidery by that I won at the auction!
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Chesapeake Bay Program Aug 12
there are eight species of sea slugs in the Chesapeake Bay? These soft-bodied mollusks shed their shells before they hatch or when they are larvae.
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Cardiff Curator Aug 12
Today’s is some of the fantastic shells on display . Great to see a huge diversity of species in one place
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DigAtlasAncientLife Aug 12
Pirsila simpla (Stephenson 1953) was a barrel bubble from the Late Woodbine Fm. of Texas. These snails were carnivores and could fully retract into their shells.
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DigAtlasAncientLife Aug 12
Holotype of hattini (KUMIP 108807) from the Turonian (93.9-89.8 million years ago) belongs to the 'hook-shaped' . When cut in half, you can see its internal chambers used for buoyancy control.
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Alton Dooley Aug 12
This is Pecten bellus from the Pleistocene of Ventura County, collected by in 2010 and now at . It will be on display in “Life in the Ancient Seas”.
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Christopher Mah Aug 14
Wow. a STUNNING image of a "mole cowrie" Talparia talpa with its mantle fully deployed around the shell. Image by Francois Baelen via FB
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DigAtlasAncientLife Aug 12
were so plentiful during the , they have time zones established for when species occurred. The Inoceramus pictus zone was in the Upper Cenomanian (93.99 ± 0.72 to 93.32 ± 0.38 million years ago). (FHSM 1742)
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