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Gabriel N. U. Jun 1
Morning sketch. Portrait of Tetraceratops insignis, a small basal sphenacodontian synapsid (probably close to therapsids) from Early Permian North America. A distant relative to all of us mammals.
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BBC Wildlife Jun 1
Dogs: Why canids rule the world
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Cenozoic Central Jun 1
It's and I bring you another member of the sparassodont family, munizi! It was the biggest sparassodont in the region during the Early Miocene. Just like it's cousin Borhyaena, it had crushing capabilities.
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Mammal Society Jun 1
The average lifespan of a is 1 year. Within this time a female will give birth to 5/6 litters of 4-5 young in each & adults weigh 20-40g. Field voles mainly feed on leaves & stems of grasses but occasionally on mosses (C) Phil Winter
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Michael S. Y. Lee (biologist) May 31
For Green ringtail just hangin' round ... ... showing off its grippy padded hands and tail
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Mammal Society Jun 1
Pinch, Punch, First Day of the Month! This is the field vole, Microtus agrestis. Found throughout mainland Britain & offshore islands but absent from those including: Orkney, Shetland, Lundy, Isles of Scilly & Channel Islands. Not in Ireland but throughout Europe.
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rlchamphotography Jun 2
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German Society for Mammalian Biology Jun 1
The Gambian Epauletted Fruit Bat (Epomophorus gambianus) feeds on various fruits, particularly figs but also introduced species, and heavily uses nectar of species of Fabaceae, Bigoniaceae and Malvaceae like this baobab
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Wildlife Aid Jun 1
Well done to everyone who took part in this week's ! Some fantastic images (along with a sneaky kestrel & horse, too!). Here're just a few of the entries, well done Hannah Vincent, Louise Brown, Jane Roberts, Megan Mahony. 👏
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Jasmine Kamal-Pasha Jun 1
Did someone say ?! Let's start the week with my favourite wild city dweller, the ! I'm lucky enough to currently have 3 local foxes & lockdown has allowed me to get to know them a lot better - I'm loving every minute!
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London National Park City* Jun 1
OK! Who's got a picture of an urban to share? Reply with your 🦊📷's and let's see how many we can share in this thread ⬇️ We'll start with this brilliant photo by photographer !
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BBC Wildlife May 31
Photo of the Day: / : Five cheetahs in the Masai Mara National Reserve, in Kenya, by If you would like your photo to be considered for Photo of the Day, use the hashtag: Find out more on our website:
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Helen McCallin Jun 1
Sneezing beaver! Incredible experience last night at the beaver pond with this one only about ten feet away☺️
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Mammal Society Jun 1
the field vole's main habitat is rough, ungrazed grassland & young forest plantations 🌱 However they can be found in a range of habitats including: woodland, hedgerows, bogs, dunes, moorland & road verges where grass is found (C) Katie Morris
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Mammal Society Jun 1
ID: 🐾Grey/brown fur rather than red/brown of bank vole 🐾Blunt, rounded nose, small furry ears, small eyes 🐾Head-body: 8-13cm, tail is ~1/3 of this 🐾Woven grass nests ~10cm diameter at base of grass tussocks/in burrows 🐾May see tunnels in long grass
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Mark Hows Jun 1
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Mammal Society Jun 1
Want to know how our species the is doing in Wales? Or any other in Wales? Email your questions to info@themammalsociety.org and we'll put your themed questions to our experts in the next session this month!
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BBC Wildlife Jun 1
Conservation: Glimmer of hope for world's rarest primate, from
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Mammal Society Jun 1
We hope you learnt something new about the - to read more about this small mammal visit the page on our website: (C) Derek Crawley
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Arindam Bhattacharya Photography May 31
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