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Adam Weinstock Sep 14
On September 15th 2008 Lehman Brothers filed for, what remains to this day, the largest bankruptcy in US history. The next day I bought 1 share and got a certificate to keep on my desk. I did this to always remember and keep me focused in all I do for my clients!
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Michael Janda Sep 13
Reading a lot about the Lehman Brothers collapse ten years ago and want a refresher on how it actually played out? has you covered
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BBC Business Sep 12
Who was to blame for the global financial crisis? explains in this animated explainer. And for a full in-depth look by at 'the lost decade', take some time for this long read:
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Afshin Rattansi Sep 14
Saturday's w/ who calls out Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney, formerly of the Vampire Squid.
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Harry Leslie Smith Sep 15
Make no mistake the collapse of and then the crash of the world's financial markets 10 years ago was a greater calamity than 911. And yet there are no memorials to the victims of the greed of the 1%.
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br77 Sep 15
I’m raising my glass to . They were good times, they were bad times...And yet I learnt a good deal, yet I lost a great deal, here’s to the next innings!
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Eva Zheng 郑怡斌 عائشة Sep 12
This week marks 10 years since the collapse of , which triggered the worst in almost a century. QE n low rates hv boosted stock markets worldwide, while wages n salaries stagnated, exacerbating income inequality. Can we survive the next crisis?
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Shadz Sep 16
Replying to @Marilynj5858
10 years after collapse, have NOT changed! do NOT lend savers' money - they create -Money & receive billions in on that which was Created From N0THING! On this & 7th Anniversary, maybe consider that:
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UNCTAD Sep 14
"The main problem is not just that growth is tepid, but that it is driven largely by Spot-on analysis by one of our directors, Richard Kozul-Wright, of where we sit a decade after collapsed.
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Jack Aldane Sep 16
"I thought it was a mistake to let go. The cost to the world economy was enormous, and I don't think we've solved some of the problems of globalisation that had emerged before." on The Corner Table podcast 👇
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Ekta Batra Sep 16
the day fell i was opp NYSE. just out of college i kept wondering why all these men w/ green suits were standing outside in the day looking upset. similar case w/ those suave looking bankers in posh black suits frm other buildings. little did i know.
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BBC Business Sep 12
"I'm earning the same amount per hour now as I was earning 10 years ago." How did the financial crisis a decade ago affect your life?
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Rok Gornik Sep 15
Today (September 15th) marks the 10th anniversary which some call the beginning of the Great Recession. Financial sector and global economy collapsed on that day with the fall of bank. Leaders now claim (again) we are better prepared.But is it any different today?
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Boston Globe Opinion Sep 14
10 years after , Washington should be pushing for stricter oversight and more accountability for giant banks. From :
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Popular Resistance 5h
The crisis wasn’t just a breakdown of regulatory oversight. It was a failure of the democratic process, of economic management as an apolitical, technocratic field.
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Marty Gilroy Sep 14
10th anniversary of collapse maybe a good time to say I’m starting a PhD on post-crash fiction this semester! Excited to do my bit to dismantle neoliberal capitalism w/ astute literary analysis & theoretical nous
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Carol Gould Sep 15
'was a victim' of the 2008 financial crash, says ex-boss Tom Russo -
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Peter Barkow Sep 15
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Karim Walker Sep 17
Ten years after the collapse of , what us the most important lesson the nation has not learned?
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Ashhish K Paanday Sep 17
Ten years on from the collapse of the appetite for risk taking within banking may have swung too far the other way. The risk-averse culture means they can't support the economy and generate jobs and growth. If they are totally without risk,
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