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Audubon Society 26 Feb 18
Native plants are better for birds, easy to care for, and better for the environment.
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US Fish and Wildlife Feb 25
Meet the candy darter, a small colorful fish fighting invasive and non-native fish for food and habitat. Help candy darters and other native species - clean and dry all gear and don't dump live fish from one body of water to another đź“· T. Travis Brown
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Olympic Forest Feb 26
One way we work to keep invasive species from spreading is by saving & growing seed from native plants to help restore areas that have been disturbed or that need rehabilitation:
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USDA Forest Service Mar 3
There’s no such thing as bad insects. But when they move from their native ecosystem into a new one, they can create big problems.
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Sydenham Hill Wood 23 Mar 18
It's - did you know that garden plants like cherry laurel and rhododendron pose serious threats to native oak woodlands? Research suggests impact can prevent natural regeneration for 30 years after rhododendron is cleared.
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Sanctuaries (NOAA) 2 Mar 18
You can help reduce the spread of invasive species by reducing marine debris: always dispose of your waste properly and join beach cleanups in your area whenever you can!
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Sydenham Hill Wood 26 Mar 18
For we're highlighting the impact of cherry laurel (Prunus lauroscerasus) in the . Widely sold as a garden hedge, it escapes into woods and reduces them to veritable ecological deserts. Please plant native species instead.
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US Department of the Interior Feb 27
From rodents to carp to cheatgrass, learn how land managers are working together to combat invasive species and protect public lands & waters:
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Badlands Nat'l Park Mar 2
As comes to a close, we would like to give a shout out to our Exotic Plant Management Team. Armed with backpack sprayers, ATVs, and tyvek suits, this crew is tasked with keeping out prairie as pristine as possible.
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Smithsonian's NMNH Feb 27
A native of the Indo-Pacific, lionfish now swim in the Caribbean and Atlantic Ocean. Not only do they have a voracious appetite, but their venomous spines mean they have few natural predators to help control their population.
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NMNH_Entomology 27 Feb 18
The spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) is a treehopper native to east Asia that was found in Pennsylvania in 2014. US agricultural agencies are rushing to stop the spread of this pest, which damages important crops like fruit trees and grapes.
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Jason Smith 28 Feb 18
A single clonal ambrosia beetle and its clonal fungal symbiont has killed nearly half a billion trees in about 16 years! That’s a impactful INVASIVE @Dr_For_Ent
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CIF-IFC 2 Mar 18
Invasive forest pests/pathogens are a problem for forest landscapes in Canada & it is important to help control & prevent the impacts (ecological, economic & social) & spread of these species. Learn more here:
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Shedd Aquarium Feb 25
Invasive species really live up to their name—they're non-native species that deplete resources in their newfound home. Here at Shedd, you can take a closer look at invasive species like the sea lamprey in our Great Lakes gallery.
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Audubon Society Feb 27
Across eastern North America, an insect the size of a grain of pepper is devastating ancient hemlocks—and migrating birds may be helping to spread this pest.
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Corey Dunn Feb 27
Dodge, duck, dip, dive & dodge! Silver Carp are a prolific introduced species thriving in lowland rivers throughout the Midwest. They also jump, so keep your head on a swivel!
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Shedd Aquarium 1 Mar 18
Invasive species are non-native animals that deplete native resources—from food to territory to other animals. During , meet some Great Lakes intruders and learn more about their effect on the local environment!
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Dept. of Agriculture 28 Feb 18
all 50 states and the U.S. territories have at least some ? By some estimates, their economic impact exceeds $1 billion annually in the U.S. from lost revenue and cleanup costs. Learn more about hungry pests here:
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Sleeping Bear Dunes 27 Feb 17
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Kevin Walker 27 Mar 18
This is a rather attractive garden escape Glory-of-the-snow Scilla (Chionodoxa) forbesii, here naturalised on the banks of the River Ure near Masham; becoming quite a common alien but not invasive
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