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The YUNiversity Nov 21
“Sleep tight” is a 19th-century expression that means ‘sleep well.’ 😴 This form of “tight” can also be seen in the phrase “Sit tight,” which means ‘don’t move’ or ‘don’t do anything.’
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BBC Learning English Nov 21
✋ If you’re trying to learn some new idioms, this table could be handy!✋ We’ve got some hand-related idioms for you to learn.
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Learner's Dictionary Nov 18
Idiom: miss the boat = to fail to use an opportunity If I don't act now I could miss the boat on this investment.
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BBC Learning English 19h
Do you ‘go bananas’ for ? Then, watch as The Teacher explains three common connected with ‘fruit’ and let us know which other idioms you know! More idioms here:
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Literary Express Nov 22
Using idioms while speaking is the hallmark of a proficient speaker. If you're looking forward to enhancing your level of vocabulary, then the list of idioms given in this post, we feel, will be of tremendous help to you.
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Learner's Dictionary Nov 19
Idiom: the best/greatest thing since sliced bread = used to describe something or someone that you think is very good, useful, etc. He thinks wireless Internet access is the greatest thing since sliced bread.
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Learn English Nov 19
HUNGRY 🍕starving 🍕famished 🍕ravenous 🍕got the munchies 🍕on an empty stomach
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Learn English Nov 18
FOOD IDIOMS 🥜in a nutshell 🍰a piece of cake ☕not my cup of tea 🍴to spice things up 🥚to put all your eggs in one basket
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Learner's Dictionary 9h
Idiom: a hard/tough nut to crack = a person or thing that is difficult to deal with, understand, or influence The problem is a tough nut to crack.
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EOI Teacher Nov 23
✔ To go blank 》If your mind goes blank, or if you go blank, you are unable to remember something that you know . ▪︎I just went blank and I didn't know what to say. ▪︎When she asked me that question my mind went blank.
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EOI Teacher Nov 19
🇺🇸 To run/blow hot and cold 》To change your mind or your attitude a lot towards the same person or thing. ▪︎Her feelings run hot and cold; one minute she's madly in love with Jim and the next she seems to hate him.
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Jason P. Steed 9h
"Big wig" dates to the 17th c. when men wore wigs. Men of high status (bishops, judges, etc.) wore bigger ones, and thus were known as...well, you get it.
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EnglishWords Nov 19
IDIOM We got demolished! ➡️ To be completely beaten. Example: The last time we played football against that team we were demolished! ⚽️
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BBC Learning English Nov 18
Improve your by learning and with our -tongued teacher and let us know whether you agree with the “Every cloud has a silver lining”! Discover more idioms here:
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EOI Teacher Nov 19
✔ To come to blows (with someone/over something) 》To start fighting with someone after a disagreement. ▪︎They came to blows over a parking space at the shopping centre. ▪︎Street protesters came to blows with the police.
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Italian with Susanna Nov 18
Meglio di niente= Better than nothing
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Learn English Nov 17
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Learner's Dictionary Nov 20
Idiom: two peas in a pod = used to say that two people or things are very similar to each other My brother and I are two peas in a pod. We both like the same things.
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Christopher Patrick Taylor Nov 17
Once this week is done (current schedule my day off is Thursday) I'm going to get as close to "halfway to Concord" as I can without ubearable suffering on Friday. h/t
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Italian with Susanna Nov 20
"Chi troppo vuole nulla stringe" (= those who want too much, don't grab anything) is an proverb discouraging greed and unrealistic expectations.
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