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Lindsey Fitzharris Feb 10
Tinted, double-hinged spectacles, c.1790. Many opticians believed green or blue glass was easier on the eyes and would reduce glare; while clear glass was too soft and would distort images. This extraordinary example is from .
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Past Medical History Feb 13
The famous 'photograph 51' - dubbed by some as the most important photo ever taken. This X-ray diffraction image of crystallized DNA was taken by Rosalind Franklin and Raymond Gosling in 1952 and was critical evidence in identifying the double-helical structure of DNA.
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Dave Electrotherapy 6m
Electro Galvanic Regenetator. Groot Electric Co. Restores Health and Strength. 1889.
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Past Medical History 18h
Professors Welch, Halsted, Osler and Kelly - the four founding doctors of Johns Hopkins Hospital, each a larger-than-life personality
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Past Medical History Feb 14
An illustration of the polymath and physician Avicenna, from medieval a manuscript entitled ‘Subtilties of Truth’ c.1271. Avicenna has been described as the father of early modern medicine.
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RCSI 15h
The story of pioneering Cork surgeon Dr James Barry, who lived as a man to pursue a medical career, will be shared on tonight at 8.30pm.
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Melissa Dickson 13h
Our edited volume is out now, with essays on cancer, suicide, and social degeneration as products of stresses of 'new' ways of living, and others on legal, institutional, & intellectual changes that contributed to modern medical practice.
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DisabilityHistory Feb 12
The black experience of disability, including polio, was indelibly marked by segregation. The Tuskegee Institute Infantile Paralysis Center was opened in 1941, and was intended to accommodate race-based segregation in the treatment/rehab of polio.
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Anaesthesia Heritage Feb 11
Today we’re celebrating such as Rupa Bai Furdoonji, who is considered the world’s first female , practising at the turn of the last century. Training in India, Scotland & the US, she held degrees in physics, chemistry and medicine👩‍⚕️
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Alexandre Klein 13h
(New Book) Translation at Work. Chinese Medicine in the First Global Age
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StoriaDellaMedicina Feb 13
Dorothy Mabel Reed was a physician specializing in cellular . In 1901, she discovered that Hodgkin's was not a form of tuberculosis, by noticing the presence of a special , the (Reed–Sternberg cell) which bears her name.
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Dave Electrotherapy 1h
Color O Zone Facts. Directions and Testimonials
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DisabilityHistory 5h
‘DONT PAT DOG when it is leaind its master. Attention from strangers is distracting and confusing. Offer your help but leave the dog alone.’ This captioned photo appeared in Life in 1947, as part of the VA ‘DOs and DON’Ts’. Some things never change.
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DisabilityHistory Feb 16
Since it appears Twitter is pondering eugenics this morning and whether or not it ‘works’, as Richard Dawkins suggests, a little reminder of the history of eugenics in Nazi Germany.
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A.J. Wright 5h
Today’s Find: Blog post “The Doctor, His Son the Spy & The Police”
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Black Plaques Feb 16
There's pus, gangrene and an ulcerous penis, but also the incredibly moving story of Lister performing his first mastectomy on his sister – on the dining room table at Woodside Place, Glasgow.
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Dr Bronagh Ann McShane 5h
Amazing to hear about the story of Dr James Barry on now
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Dr Hannah J Elizabeth Feb 12
I am delighted to announce that in July I will start a Wellcome Fellowship researching how HIV-affected families built and maintained themselves through acts of love, care, & activism in Edinburgh (1981-2016). So brace yourselves for even more & content!
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Aparna Nair Feb 16
Look up the fine historical scholarship on Galton’s intellectual, policy and social legacies here And here:
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RCSEd Library & Archive Feb 11
Dispensing medicines, Nazareth Hospital, 1960s. Also known as "The Scottish Hospital" to locals as it was established by Turkish-born & Edinburgh trained doctor Kaloost Vartan in the 1860s with Edinburgh Medical Missionary Society funding
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