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Sarah Farrell 10h
For those wanted the SPAG cards, here's the link for the first 10 sets! They cover topics like capital letters, was/were, you're/your and all have the answers on the back. Useful for gentle writing reminders in these first few weeks!
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Martin Poler Sep 12
Twitter nerds. Should it be (Name of school) infants school (Name of school) infants' school (Name of school) infant's school (Name of school) infant school? Genuinely stuck on this, which is unusual for me!
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Sarah Farrell 11h
I can't take credit for this idea as I've seen other people use it before, but I'm looking forward to trying out my new Lego contraction builders this week! The only problem is that I didn't have enough to cover all ry contractions I wanted to...
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Matthew Warner Sep 14
Grammar PSA: "should have" or "should've." Not "should of." Thank you.
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Linguistics Girl MLS MS Sep 14
A modifier typically precedes a noun in English. Some (borrowed) phrases contain a modifier that follows the noun: attorney general battle royal court martial femme fatale film noir heir apparent notary public poet laureate president elect professor emeritus
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Dr Maia Newley Sep 12
What people say about . However they try to justify that it does not really matter, I feel it important to point out that: Let’s eat grandma And Let’s eat, grandma Are two very different things..
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Grammar Badger Bot Sep 14
Is it ok to refer to a single person as ‘they’? Read more!
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English Grammar Sep 12
Who knows the answer? Full exercise and answers at:
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Nat Russo Sep 9
Further vs. Farther: Farther implies physical distance. You don't explore an issue farther. You explore it further.
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Ray Sep 13
Dad’s little buddy’s what? 🤦🏽‍♂️
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Kirsty Louise Morgan Sep 14
Reading information and papers where "should of" and "could of" have been used, is just as painful as when people use the wrong "their/there/they're" or "your/you're"
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💙💎💸 EvE 💸💎💙 Sep 8
The difference between knowing your shit and knowing you're shit ...💁🏼‍♀️
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EnglishStudy! 🇬🇧 🇪🇺 Sep 13
Phrasal Verb – Count on Meaning – To depend on someone or something “I know I’ve been busy recently but you can always count on me if you are having a hard time.”
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The YUNiversity 16h
“Each” is singular, so each others’ → ❌ each other’s → ✔ Staring into *each other’s* eyes 👀, we ate *each other’s* fries. 🍟
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Dr Maia Newley Sep 12
In the same way, back to again: There is a world of difference between: Helping Uncle jack off a horse And Helping Uncle Jack off a horse.
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🌷 Sep 9
Replying to @tulipwhispers
Present simple vs present progressive
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Nat Russo Sep 10
Perfect in dialogue can sound odd. I ain't even gonna lie.
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IndependenceDay.scot Sep 14
Who’s hands is the SNPs blood on? Did I miss something here? 🤷🏻‍♂️ Ya think their banner is missing a comma?
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Heather Krey Sep 14
Here's a question like one you might see on the or . Post your answer and I'll "like" it if you're correct. Follow me for more practice every day!
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IELTS with Fiona Sep 14
When you would use this expression? With someone you know well? Someone you haven’t seen for a while? Someone you meet face to face? 🤔But never in a DM to a complete stranger, with no other message?
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