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Lauren 📖 Jul 8
"Photos were rare I only remember one. I must have been 6 or 8 years old but small for my age. This was taken by a regular photographer. " 1987, Margaret Beech Furry Roudabush 1901-1998. Great-grandma my
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DSRGenealogist 17h
Something’s gone seriously wrong with this tree... Can you spot it? 🤣🤣🤣
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Lauren 📖 Jul 14
I want societies to work more with county to bring to life objects that just otherwise sit there with minimal context. I tried doing this when I worked in a county historical society that had a museum. Some already do this, but should be more!
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CMS Research and Genealogy Jul 12
in 1973, a fire destroys the entire sixth floor of the National Personnel Records Center of the United States. Genealogists still feel the sting 46 years later.
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Emily S Jul 16
This might be an unpopular opinion, but I truly feel that conferences should notify both those accepted and rejected AT THE SAME TIME. Isn’t this just common courtesy?? I really feel it’s rude to not let you know when the others know.
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Becks Kobel 💄👻 Jul 9
That’s one way of saying unibrow 😂
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Becks Kobel 💄👻 Jul 17
Looking for interviewees for my personal genealogy blog The Hipster Historian. You don’t have to be a professional just someone interested in history/genealogy and have a passion about it. If you want to be or want to nominate someone. So it below!
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Erin, Master Builder Jul 14
today’s reminder: the baptismal record occasionally has the death date as a notation. Helpful when you remember this a year later. Especially helpful when their record is in another parish book than you expect!
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Genealogy Jude Jul 13
Do you have an ancestor that received poor relief, was recorded in poor law settlement records or moved long distances to find work? This article is well worth reading for the insights it gives on life for those in poverty.
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Jan Murphy Jul 10
Tip for genealogists: make a copy of what you answered on the Census and keep it with your research. Otherwise your family will have to wait 72 years to find out.
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Stephanie Pitcher Whittier Jul 9
Our last move meant hard decisions and leaving some things in storage in Vermont longer than I'd like, including my books Thank you for always having the best reference catalog available for check out so I don't have to replace them. You're awesome.
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Family History Fanatics Jul 14
One of the cool things you can find in Civil War pension files is a marriage certificate! Milby Townsend and Lucinda Bragg! What have you discovered this week?
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UNSOLVED MAGAZINE Jul 16
Rejoice! Another one behind bars! Thanks (once again) to work.
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DSRGenealogist Jul 10
Two genealogy-filled weeks are about to start, including family reunion, graveyard searching and visit to the local records office. But the main highlight will definitely be to take Dad to Ypres. Hopefully this time I’ll be able to locate a relative’s grave nearby.
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mar a lago delenda est Jul 16
Replying to @mckait
These three loomis siblings share a common descendant. And it’s not the only trio of siblings like that in my tree. Connecticut: The Inbreeding State.
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Genealogy Stories Jul 11
Not everyday a funeral procession of 4 white horses and carriage trots past your door. I live on quite a busy road near the heart of my city! I sat here imagining that these were the sounds the original occupiers of my home would have heard.
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Judy G. Russell Jul 9
Don't just bookmark that wonderful online resource. Wayback it too!
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David Allen Lambert Jul 13
Have you researched the of your home? Beyond the boards & foundation, back through the old land deeds? I am delighted to lecture to your group as the Adopt a local history project to help preserve your community or your own home.
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DSRGenealogist Jul 16
10/10 of Spain’s most common surnames are patronymics (they derive from first names), most of them with the -ez ending denoting “son of”.
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IAAM CFH 15h
New on IAAM CFH: African American Genealogy: How Using a Timeline Helps in Your Research.
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