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Dr Dave Hone Jul 31
People forget, or simply just don't realise, how big the largest hadrosaurs were. Shantungosaurs was likely comparable in mass to even some of the larger sauropods.
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CofCNatHistory 15h
This fearsome looking skull belongs to Archaeotherium ingens – a strange extinct hoofed mammal. These beasts would have not closely resembled any modern mammal – outwardly resembling a wild hog or peccary but with long, deer-like legs.
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Sarah Boessenecker, MSc. 🏛️ 17h
Happy ! Who wore it better: Sir Richard Owen, ~1877 or me, 2020
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Christian Kammerer Jul 31
Hard to pick only one specimen to celebrate the memory of John Nyaphuli, but the beautifully-prepared holotype of Patranomodon nyaphulii, the earliest known anomodont therapsid, was certainly one of his greatest finds.
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Kimi Chapelle 20h
Here is a cutie patootie Trirachodon specimen from for !
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Reconsidering Cinema 14h
When your doesn't go quite as planned...
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Erika Anderson 18h
Gorgosaurus libratus skull holotype for this . Gotta love this tyrannosaurid’s big teeth.
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Diana, Scholar of the First Fin 3h
I wrote another blog, this time about Ernietta plateauensis, a squishy filter feeder from the very end of the Ediacaran period!
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Ben Miller Jul 31
This latest iteration of SUE is the coolest thing I've ever worked on. Especially in these bad times, it's nice to celebrate the people at Blue Rhino Studio and who willed this beast into existence. Here's a detailed look for :
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Andrew Milner 15h
Happy ! UMNH VP 24306 - The first phytosaur skull we collected (2009) from San Juan County, from The Church Rock Member, Chinle Formation. On temporary exhibit and will be moved to if things ever calm down...
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Mark Witton 20h
of three South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus) for , from 2018. I don't know what they're looking at either. Possibly food, possibly danger, possibly someone has a nice hat.
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Gabriel N. U. Jul 31
Work in Progress. Very early stages of this illustration depicting the coelurosaur Aorun preying on a small mammal in a Late Jurassic dry forest of China. I have spend about 4 hours in this piece, mostly concentrate on the head so far
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Dr Dean Lomax 23h
Please take a moment to appreciate this thing of beauty.  One of the best fossil fish I have ever seen.  An exquisitely preserved 150 million-year-old Hybodus shark from Solnhofen, Germany. 🦈 On display at the Wyoming Dinosaur Center. 
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Jack Horner Jul 31
These small raptorial dinosaurs with recurved claws and bladed, serrated teeth, defy the notion that a dinosaur apex predator needs to have been large. Just imagine, just one of these clinging to your back, slashing and feeding on you while you thrashed helplessly.
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Paige Madison Jul 31
"Luck has its own way of striking," a paleoanthropologist once said of the Sangiran fossil site. Javanese farmers often made accidental discoveries that helped scientists narrow in on localities and find specimens like the stunning Sangiran 17 skull. 📸Hisao Baba
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Skye Walker 8h
Happy from Nigersaurus! Fun fact: Nigersaurus is the only known tetrapod animal to have had jaws wider than its skull and teeth that extended laterally across the front! 🦕
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Danny Barta 16h
It’s ! Here’s a gorgeous exhibit from the Orlov Museum, Moscow, of the unusual pareiasaurs! Pareiasaurs were an early-diverging group of herbivorous reptiles that became widespread during the Permian period, ending with their extinction ~250 million years ago.
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Chris Stringer 23h
The beautifully preserved Harbin skull from China. Found in 1933 and then apparently hidden down a well for the next 80 years or so...
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Crow Artist 11h
Had fun learning with and drawing the Dilophosaurus! And its hard finding good masking tape!
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American Museum of Natural History Jul 31
When the Sinornithosaurus millennii fossil was discovered in Liaoning, China, it joined a growing list of dinosaur fossils showing evidence that animals other than birds had a featherlike covering. This fossil is unique for its astonishingly clear feather imprints.
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