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Southern Regional Extension Forestry Aug 6
Got questions? Want a quick answer? check out the Southern Forest and Tree Health Diagnostics Facebook group!
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PPIC Water Aug 9
California wildfires are fueled by a warming climate, drought, and decades of management practices that resulted in overly dense forests. Here are 4 points for why we should move toward ecologically sound forest management for :
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Western Caucus May 8
Today, Western Caucus Members released statements of support for ⁦’s⁩ reintroduction of the Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2019. This critical legislation will prevent catastrophic wildfires and improve .
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Ellen Crocker Jul 25
detected in southwest KY. This disease can rapidly kill sassafras trees. Look for sudden death with red-brown leaves still attached and dark streaks under the bark. If you notice something suspicious, let your county agent know
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Clemson University Forest Health Aug 13
Day 1 at The Jones Center at Ichauway was a success! We set poop traps and saw lots of cool things along the way! Hoping to find out what happens to dung and carrion beetles when we exclude large predators. More to come!
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Clemson University Forest Health Aug 1
It's bagworm season! These conspicuous critters don't usually do too much damage but can be unsightly. Hand picking may be enough to control them but insecticides may be necessary next spring and summer
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Denita Hadziabdic, PhD Aug 3
At , their management involves favoring healthy individual trees and removing those with structural imperfections. They create resilient forests by maintaining and fostering and .
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Dr. David Coyle Aug 12
Lots of larger elm leaf beetle activity in north & central GA this week. Larval feeding turns trees brown with dead, holey leaves. Populations of this native pest flare up occasionally, but late season defoliation like this probably won't hurt the trees.
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Dr. David Coyle Aug 7
The and threat emerald ash borer is in 35 states and 5 provinces. Obviously it's here to stay, and management is effective only at the local level. Biocontrol seems to be partially working in some natural areas. Map by , pic .
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Pepperwood Jul 26
We are leading a project in partnership with and the to create dashboards for that will help inform land management strategies to reduce fuel loads and build the resilience of our natural resources.
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Susanna Keriö Aug 4
Glad to see APS recognizing the leadership and the excellent forest pathology research of Glenn Stanosz in . experts are needed more than ever to work on forest resilience, to address the impacts of invasive pathogens and pests.
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MS Forestry Commission Aug 6
Cogongrass is one of the most invasive weeds in the world & the MFC is offering assistance to landowners in Forrest & Lamar counties to help control its spread. More info -
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Denita Hadziabdic, PhD Aug 6
Super proud of our alumni who is doing amazing things focusing on for his research with . So we had family visit to his poster :). Keep up the good work.
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Jad Daley Aug 14
A blindspot for many people on is . While we try to grow our forest carbon sink, we must overcome downward pressure from pests & other forest health threats that are often being exacerbated by .
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CAFWA Jul 1
Shaded fuel breaks can be a critical tool for managing forest health. Read more at
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Aurélien Sallé May 5
The second paper of the topical issue "Entomological issues during forest diebacks" is out ! Congrats to Amani Bellahirech & coll. for their paper on ambrosia beetles & cork oak dieback in Tunisia. !!
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Denita Hadziabdic, PhD Aug 5
And lastly, and I had a pleasure of taking a photo with APS Fellow Glenn Stanosz who was recognized for his leadership and excellence in forest pathology research.
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MS Forestry Commission Jul 31
The southern pine beetle is the most destructive forest insect in the South. The MFC works with landowners to manage and prevent southern pine beetle infestations. Learn more> .
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American Forests Aug 14
NEW ON THE BLOG: The Interconnectedness of Bears, Mushrooms and Bees
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USDA Climate Hubs Feb 21
is already affecting across the Mid-Atlantic region, reports key takeaway: “future changes could dramatically alter the landscape that characterizes the region.”
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