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Anne Louise Avery Nov 15
In Finland, the Northern Lights are called "revontulet" or "fox fires". One old folktale tells of an Arctic fox running and scampering in the far north, throwing coloured lights up into the dark sky by sweeping frozen snow crystals upwards with his tail.
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Amanda Edmiston, Botanica Fabula Nov 15
One of the legends around Edinburgh's dormant volcano Arthur's Seat is that it is in fact a sleeping dragon who ate so much he went to sleep+hasn't woken since~seems fitting! I wonder how many other volcanoes have fire breathing dragon legends attached to them?
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Adam Pidgeon Nov 15
Herodotus wrote of Persian invaders in 479BC preparing to assault a town on the Kassandra peninsula being swept away by an angry Poseidon. Modern scientists found evidence on the peninsula of a tsunami that occurred around 500BC. Don't mess with Poseidon.
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❅Royai Nov 15
I'm gonna start doing posts every week since Malay folklore is dying. Let's start with something simple. Malay belief held that anyone who can find the nest of the white-breasted waterhen (burung ruak-ruak) would acquire the ability to turn invisible
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P J Richards Nov 15
🔥⚒️🔥The island of Vulcano in the Mediterranean, has given us the word 'volcano'. Romans believed it was the forge of Vulcan, blacksmith to the gods. Eruptions were the sparks flying up as he hammered out thunderbolts for Jupiter, and forged weapons for Mars.
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Ide Crawford Nov 16
St Cuthbert's cave (Holywell, Cornwall) has been sacred since ancient times. Mothers carried their ailing children across the sands at low tide to the narrow mouth of the cave, to touch the blessed water. On the cliffs above are prehistoric barrows.
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Bridget M. Klusman Nov 15
In Irish myth, Scáthach lived on an island in an impregnable castle where she trained numerous Celtic heroes in the arts of pole vaulting (useful in the assault of forts), underwater fighting, and combat with a barbed harpoon of her own invention, the gáe bolg.
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The Pilgrim Nov 15
If you don't wake up a poet after sleeping on Cadair Idris, beware as it's said to be one of the hunting grounds of Gwyn ap Nudd and his Cŵn Annwn. Its howling foretold death to anyone who heard it, sweeping up that person's soul to send to the underworld.
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Peter Naldrett 2h
Just seen the proofs for my New Year's Eve piece on Stonehaven in The Countryman - it's a great folk tradition and you must check it out if you get the chance!
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Melanie Nov 15
The Chinese believe Imperial Guardian Lions have special protective powers to ward off negative energy. They are placed in pairs near entrances. The male holds an orb beneath his paw- representing power. The female holds a cub- representing protection.
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Laura Wattie Nov 14
The Hantu Air is a spirit of the water in Malaysian folklore. Described as the unseen inhabitants of rivers, lakes and oceans, they are associated with and blamed for calamities including drownings and floods.
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MadHats Nov 12
Replying to @JulieBorowski
Inspired by and my fascination with witches, I recently wrote a short witchy poem about a Yew Tree & Pagan Green Men. It was published in Eye to the Telescope last week. Read “The Ladies of Lancashire” here:
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Emma ♡🍁🍂 Nov 15
Norwegian Folklore tells that the Northern lights are the souls of old maids dancing across the sky. Likewise in Scotland they are called the merry dancers.
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C.S. Voll Nov 15
Pele is the goddess of fire and volcanoes in the Hawaiian pantheon. She is believed to reside in the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater on the island of Hawaii, where she produces lava if she is displeased. Click below to read more.
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Madeleine D'Este Nov 12
Are children's skipping games and nursery rhymes actually spells? Academic musing from 1889
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MadHats Nov 18
Replying to @ThaddeusRussell
Equinox means “equal night” & on the (23 Sep) day & night are the same length. Thereafter the dark part of the year truly begins. The (25 Sep GMT) is the closest to the autumn equinox The Hayfield, Thomas Armstrong, 1869
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Katie-Ellen Nov 15
If the goddess of the river Severn, Sabre/old Welsh Hafren, Latinised as Sabrina is angry, there will be flood, the tidal Bore will be angry, high and fierce as she rides upstream, flanked by salmon and dolphin. But she's not cross today
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hareandtabor Nov 19
NEW IN THE SHOP! Bats tea towel.Based on design in Haekel's Art Forms in Nature (1904), chiroptera order of mammals is presented in startling clarity. 10% OF PROCEEDS TO BATS CONSERVATION TRUST
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Rock Creek Morris Nov 15
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MadHats Nov 13
As well as carrying the devil’s curse on all those who eat them after ,blackberries can protect your home against vampires. If planted nearby, a vampire gets distracted by counting the berries & forgets his harmful intentions. - Cicely Barker
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