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Adam Pidgeon Sep 20
Ancient Egyptians believed hedgehogs were immortal. Seeing the spiky critters emerge from hibernation lead to the belief that they had died and been resurrected Hedgehog figures were often left in tombs in the hope that this power would rub off on the deceased.
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Mark Rees Sep 20
This Druids Tree Goddess carving by Peter Boyd can be found at Cae Mabon in Snowdonia, Wales. Cae Mabon means "Field of Mabon" in Welsh, and refers to Mabon ap Modron, a character from the Mabinogion who lends his name to the Autumn Equinox.
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#WOMENSART Sep 20
Karoline Hjorth & Riitta Ikonen, 'Eyes as Big as Plates' photographic series based on Nordic folklore, humanity and nature
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Clare Farmer Sep 20
In Finnish mythology The Milky Way is called Linnunrata which roughly translates to "the path of the birds." The name comes from ancient Finnish belief where Linnunrata is the path along which souls are carried by sacred birds that travel to the afterlife.
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հվϲցɑղ Sep 20
You shouldn’t pick Blackberries after Michaelmas (29th September) as the berries will be sour, for this was the date Satan was banished from Heaven by St Michael and fell to earth. The Devil landed in a backberry bush which he cursed and peed on!
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Jenny Pugh Psychic Sep 20
In the Middle Ages, hares were linked to witchcraft. A hunter, following a wounded hare’s trail of blood, came to a cottage where an old woman said the cut on her arm, was from a knife. Convinced she was a witch & transformed into a hare, she was put to death
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Liza Frank Sep 20
In Scotland, it's said that white heather marks the final resting places of faeries...
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Liza Frank Sep 20
On finding your first conker of the season you should say 'oddly oddly onker, my first conker' for good luck... (also conkers are reputed to be great at keeping household spiders at bay. And now I've said conkers too much.)
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P J Richards Sep 20
🍎The Autumn Equinox - named for Welsh God Mabon - is the 2nd of the 3 Pagan harvest celebrations, falling between Lammas & Samhain. 🍂A time when Light & Dark are held in balance before the year turns towards Winter, and the Holly King takes his turn to rule.
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Laura Wattie Sep 20
In Japanese folklore, the ippon-datara is a yōkai thought to be largely harmless. It has one thick leg and one eye, and lives deep in the mountains.
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Tom Cox Sep 20
Someone once claimed to me that folklore and the people who love it are “twee”. The person was a prize dickhead. There are few less twee things than Folklore. It’s written in blood and smells of something deep in the earth.
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MagpieintheMoonlight Sep 20
In Irish folklore, a Fetch is an apparition exactly resembling a living person - a sort of doppelgänger . They're usually associated with the impending death of the person mirrored but if you see one in the morning don't panic - then they foretell a long life!
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M.i.P Sep 20
This month, it hosts a forest fruit named "Konoos"; It's mostly in the northern forests of Iran. In peoples beliefs, konoos is a popular fruit. It has a folk song that named "ei rooz booshom konoos kalē". Peoples sing it & picking up konoos.
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Goth Weather News Sep 20
Weather Warning: The ministry of demonology has issued an Amber Warning for demonic presence tonight. Residents in rural, forested areas are advised to bolt doors closed and use protective incantations.
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Devon County Council Sep 20
In Dartmoor folklore, the nine maidens were women turned into stone and cursed to dance every noon for eternity as punishment for dancing on the Sabbath. It's been suggested the tale originates from the shimmering midday heat giving the illusion of movement.
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Moments In Time Sep 20
REVERENCE FOR THE ROBIN It is said, "the Robin scorched its breast in the fires of Purgatory, mercifully taking drops of water in its beak for the lips of the parched souls in torment." Robin Photo by Andy Morffew
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Enchanted Magazine Sep 20
AUTUMN EQUINOX Weird Folklore: If you catch a red or gold leaf falling from a tree on the day of the you’ll be free of colds for the next year.
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Alexandra Epps Sep 20
Squirrels gathering nuts in a flurry, Will cause snow to gather in a hurry..
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Melanie Sep 19
The Autumn Equinox, called the Alban Elfed in Druidry, is the time period when the Sun appears to cross the celestial equator, heading southward. For many cultures it is a time to pay respects to the impending dark and thanks to the waning sunlight.
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Some Bloke in a Hat Sep 20
Can anyone tell me what species of hedgerow thorn this is?
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