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Sia Feb 7
Austėja is a Lithuanian deity of bees and friendship. The word bičiuliai, best friends, comes from the word for bee, and šeimas = both a hive and a human family. Lithuanian uses different words for the death of animals and humans, but uses the human one for bees
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Emma ♥ ♡ ♥ Feb 7
In Austria Headaches are said to be cured by going into the woods and resting your head on a tree 🌲 ✨
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Michael John Simmons Feb 7
In the 1970s, Fender created a campaign using familiar fairy tales to help sell their guitars.
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Kate Fireflo Jan 31
In Romanian, traditional vampires will bite you between the eyes or over the heart, not at the throat. Also, one of the signs of someone being likely to become a vampire is having blue eyes and red hair. Like me, Mwaahahaha!!!
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Icy Sedgwick Feb 7
According to some legends, Sekhmet was the Egyptian goddess of war. Only she got too good at smiting people. They calmed her down by convincing her red wine was actually blood and letting her sleep off the effects (my photo!)
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Woodland Trust Jan 31
“‘A Moss-woman!’ the hay-makers cry, And over the fields in terror they fly. She is loosely clad from neck to foot In a mantle of Moss from the Maple’s root, And like Lichen grey on its stem that grows Is the hair that over her mantle flows."
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Emily Steiner Jan 30
This lovely pillar in 15th-century Rosslyn Chapel resembles a tree with dragons at the foot. One theory is that it is supposed to represent Yggdrasil.
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Icy Sedgwick Jan 31
Corpse roads often crossed streams or rivers because people thought spirits, like vampires, couldn't cross running water, making it hard for them to return home after burial. More corpse roads ->
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Veðrfölnir Feb 6
In Norse mythology the incredibly beautiful goddess of love Freya possessed a cloak of Falcon feathers that enabled her to shape-shift and fly from Asgard to any of the nine worlds. Forever searching for her husband Óðr, weeping tears of gold. Peregrine Falcon
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P J Richards Feb 7
🌿🌘🌿The Huldufólk (hidden folk) of Iceland are a race of elves who make their homes in certain rocks. They are shown respect by the Icelanders, and new roads and houses will be moved from their planned sites if they threaten to disturb or displace the elves.
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TL Rose Feb 7
While humans have red blood, the Greeks believed the gods’ veins flowed, due to their divine diets, with golden ichor—a substance that kept them eternally young and strong and perhaps even powered the first robot...(source linked 👇) Art: Susan Seddon Boulet
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پیرە هەڵۆ Jan 31
Let's have a look at the ancient myth, Şamaran /shāmārān/ from . The queen of serpents, also regarded as the goddess of wisdom and the guardian of secrets, who felt in love with a person from human race, a man named Tamasp.
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Ramona G. Jan 31
The Yew Tree was held sacred in Celtic lore, symbolising death & resurrection. It is thought that this comes from the Druids observing it's long branches; the regeneration & birth of new saplings when its limbs touched the ground.
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LadyTeapots Jan 31
It’s my birthday! 🥳 Superstition involves blowing out the candles on a cake, but this one has nothing to do with love & marriage. Instead, you're supposed to make a wish as you blow out the candles. If you get them all with one breath, your wish will come true!
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Woodland Trust Jan 31
It was a frosty start this morning! Who spotted the ? The word “hoar” comes from old English and refers to the old age appearance of the : the way the ice crystals form makes it look like white hair or a beard.
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LeslyD Feb 7
In Ancient Greek myths Naiads were nymphs of springs, marshes, rivers, lakes & the like & thought to have prophetic ability. As the Nymphae Infernae Paludis they were custodians of rivers in Hades (Underworld) Just a myth? Yet in this deep dark pool ....
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Historic Scotland Jan 17
Have you ever celebrated "Big Porridge Day"? 'Superstitions of the Highlands & Islands' (1900) refers to an ancient practice in Iona of preparing a large dish of porridge and pouring it into the sea, in the hope of encouraging fish and "sea-ware" to wash ashore
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𝖈𝖍𝖆𝖈𝖆𝖑 Feb 7
Telling bees 🐝: In England and Europe it is custom to tell bees the milestones of a beekeeper’s life: births, marriages, departures, returns, deaths. Bees not told, or “put into mourning,” exact a penalty; the bees can leave the hive, stop making honey, or die.
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Maude Frome Jan 30
1st Feb is (or Imbolg - ‘in the belly’), a celebration of the start of & the quickening of new life. It is the day of the fire goddess Brigid, as she brings blessings to the hearth & fertility to the land. are her footprints.
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Veðrfölnir Feb 7
Bear folklore in Britain is widespread, seen in many shamanic practices as a God. Not surprising that this awesome animal was so highly revered by our ancestors. Bears were once part of our native forests until hunting and habitat loss drove them to extinction.
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