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Lionbridge AI Finland 5h
might not have surprising roots. However, it can also mean an "errand" (in Britain, Ireland) or "groceries, shopping" (in Ireland, Scotland and Northern Ireland)! 💡
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Iglybo Jul 17
fans I need help! This has been driving me crazy for ages. I was always taught England gets its name from Angle-land but the viking name for England is England; Eng-meadow/pasture land-country. But none of the etymology dictionaries mention the viking. Why is this?
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Εύα 9h
'Εunuch' derives from Greek eune (bed) and ekhein (keeper) as they were mostly bedchamber attendants
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Irena Akbar 21h
‘Urf’ in Urdu means ‘also known as’ or ‘better known as’, similar in usage to English ‘alias’. Example: Sameer urf Raju Urf comes from Arabic root ‘ain-ra-fa’ which means ‘know’. From this root are derived ‘Arif’(one who knows) & ‘Maroof’(that which is known)
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Etymology Nerd 10h
Dead Letters: symbols lost from the alphabet over time
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Shaula Evans Jul 17
😮Faze [feyz]: to disturb or worry; 1830, American English variant of Kentish dialect feeze "to frighten, alarm, discomfit". 🤡Phase [feyz]: a distinct period or stage; 1705, "phase of the moon," back-formed from Modern Latin phases, from Greek phasis.
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Language_Garage Jul 15
There are goats clearing brush in Riverside Park here in , and along with the signs explaining why there would be goats in a park, there’s also one explaining how New York got the monicker Gotham, meaning Goat Town in Anglo-Saxon.
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Kelly Ashley Jul 15
Tour de France fans - did you know that the original meaning of the word ‘peloton’ was ‘a small body of soldiers’? This is where we get the word ‘platoon’
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Foolproof (Sylvia Suddes) Jul 16
ECLIPSE 🌓 Greek ekleipsis – an abandonment; literally a failing, forsaking, from ek 'out' + leipein 'to leave'.
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星空みゆき Jul 17
Hoshizora (星空) means "starry sky", alluding to Cure Happy's powers of "holy light".
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Kyle Parry Jul 17
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Macmillan Dictionary Jul 17
The word of the day is CATCHPHRASE. What are your favourites? looks at the word's history and use:
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🌐❤️Nimboni ❤️🌐 Jul 14
‘Jeffrey Epstein was a terrific guy...’ Trump From the Latin terrificus, ’causing terror or fear, frightful’ from terrere, to ‘fill with fear’.
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Stephen Stone Jul 16
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courtney cantrell is, verily, a puissant gigglemug Jul 14
TIL that the words "adamant" and "diamond" share a root, a Greek word meaning "invincible" or "untameable." I ❤ so much.
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Leeds English Jul 17
K: – a dark yellowish-green colour, typically worn by soldiers. 😃 The word originates from the Urdu word, meaning dusty.
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Macmillan Dictionary 24h
'You'll like this. Not a lot, but you'll like it.' The word of the day is CATCHPHRASE. Learn about its history and use in today's post by :
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Camedieval Jul 17
HUGE congrats to 's Richard Dance on his latest publication! 👏👏👏 'Words Derived from in Sir Gawain & the Green Knight: An Etymological Survey' is now out - link below
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UselessEtymology Jul 16
Exciting news! I now have an -centric Instagram account, where you can get bite-sized word histories in graphic form just like this one. Kindly follow me at uselessetymology on .
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Irena Akbar Jul 16
Replying to @irenaakbar
Sometimes, the Urdu word ‘Maghfoor’ is added before the names of deceased persons. ‘Maghfoor’ is an Arabic-origin word which means ‘One who has been forgiven’. It comes from the root ‘ghafara’ which means ‘forgiveness’. *The joy of learning*
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