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Douha jemai Sep 21
Teaching is seeing the curiosity build in students. Suddenly their questions are more intuitive. They begin to learn from mistakes and make more educated decisions. Passion builds, making them more eager to learn...
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Rachael Lehr Sep 21
Thanks for joining us for . Please keep sharing your ideas and keep the conversation going and also connect with and everyone who joined us!
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Rachael Lehr Sep 21
Question 3: Do you see a place for STEM learning to be embedded in the existing curriculum for early childhood and primary learning? Where does STEM best fit within the existing curriculum?
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dailySTEM Sep 14
Q4: are such a simple connection in your classroom...what's your favorite & how could you use it to inspire & engage?
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S.Kraft Sep 21
A3: STEM is thinking and learning outside the box. STEM has many facets and has curicullare versatility. Of course, natural science is very well suited for STEM
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Rachael Lehr Sep 21
Replying to @Andreaakaz
The reason we teach! To see our young learners sparkle with the joy of discovery 🤩
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Morgan Kolis Sep 14
Replying to @dailystem
Kids love STEM because we actually ask them “what do you think?” And “why do you think so?” And “can you show me?” They are not just receiving info.
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S.Kraft Sep 21
A2: Many games are about exploring and discovering things. STEM offers this in many ways and promotes curiosity
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Rachael Lehr Sep 21
Join me in less than 30 minutes for as we chat all things in Early Childhood and Primary education - everyone is welcome! Here’s a sneak peek at the questions...
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Douha jemai Sep 21
A3-The secret is to tap into their natural and innate curiosity about the living world. By simply allowing them to investigate, by encouraging them to ask questions about the real world, we are engaging young children easily in ...
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S.Kraft Sep 21
A1: If we present our students in STEM- lessons questions from their own world of life and let them find natural phenomenas, we can promote and maintain this curiosity
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#EdChatEU 🇪🇺 Sep 20
Saturday is Day! Join us today for a great multilingual education chat. 👇👇👇
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dailySTEM Sep 14
Q1: Why do kids like so much? (It's a simple question, but it should guide our decisions)
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Rachael Lehr Sep 21
Don’t be shy about joining the conversation here at ☺️
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Rachael Lehr Sep 21
I have a similar number this year. Last year I had 28 and it was too big... small is nice ☺️
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Rebecca Cullin Sep 21
A2. I believe STEM is everywhere in early years - building blocks, looking at items in nature, making potions... The curiosity and open mindedness of younger Ss lends itself perfectly to exploration with STEM
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Douha jemai Sep 21
and this is help them to pursue a career in the future....
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Brittany Ballou Sep 21
A5: I think not enough PD is done for Ts to realize how easy it is to integrate learning into their curriculum. Time needs to be set aside for explicit PD during regular teaching hours & not another after school bc Ts aren’t fully engaged then.
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Bir Garip Muallim (EntrepreneurTeacher)™ Sep 21
A3:I implemented the STEM education curriculum for sustainable development goals for primary school students.
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Andy Losik Sep 14
There are fabulous resources on Design Squad site. The Design Process one with the bike trailer is perfect for teaching growth mindset
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