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EABKsmilez 23h
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WaubonsieGreen May 22
Replying to @WVSCI
Wait 'till they see the infestation in that ash tree on the right. Fun stuff!
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Dr Kathleen Knight 11h
We study the effects of emerald ash borer on forest ecosystems . Dead ash trees create a gap in the forest canopy. The light filtering through has allowed the invasive honeysuckle to proliferate in the understory. Sharon Woods in Cincinnati.
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JoVonn Hill 10h
Emerald ash borers are out right now in in east TN.
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Dr Kathleen Knight 11h
Replying to @KathleenSKnight
Blue ash often survive longer than co-occurring white ash due to preference for white ash. Here’s a long dead white ash on the left and a pretty healthy blue ash on the right.
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Ingrid Schneider 2h
The treatments and resultant landscapes impact preferences and intentions to return
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Davey Tree Expert Co 19h
Don't transport firewood farther than 50 miles from where it was cut or across quarantine areas and state lines. If the wood contains emerald ash borer it could infest a whole new area. Don't risk spreading ! For federal quarantine information, visit
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Dr Kathleen Knight 11h
Replying to @KathleenSKnight
It’s blue ash, aptly named Fraxinus quadrangulata. It’s more distantly related to the other ash species, and less preferred by emerald ash borer (although many are still quite susceptible once does lay eggs on it).
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Dr Kathleen Knight 11h
Dead ash trees killed by become brittle and fall quickly, creating a pulse of coarse woody debris in early decay stages.
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kmz 23h
Does that “EAB grants to cities” mean grants to cities????
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Justin Gaudon May 14
Replying to @KathleenSKnight
Glad to hear many native understory plants are still thriving! I had some sites with high % ash composition and high ash mortality from where such as garlic mustard or buckthorn had taken over. :(
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Elijah AB May 21
Replying to @MonarchAB
someone to go Global with, someone to fulfill destiny with 👑 So maybe you're not yet in my contacts or you're in there but I don't know... this is part of what's awaiting you 😊 Signed, Hubby To Be 💍🌹❤
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Northern Research 2h
Will you be this ? holds more than meets the eye; burn it where you buy it!
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kmz May 18
When faced with a $2.5 billion dollar tab, seems the best way to spread those costs out over time is to help communities early and often.
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Neb. Forest Service 20h
Omaha students collaborated on a PSA project on what emerald ash borer (EAB) is and the impacts it will have on our state: One of the best things YOU can do is plant a variety of -friendly trees to limit :
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helene rose May 18
The trees canopy bare. The trees are all leaning ready to fall. So sad to see this happening all around .
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helene rose May 18
I drove down my country road earlier and counted at least 50 Ash trees with basically standing dead!
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Davey Tree Expert Co 23h
Here are a few ways to tell if your ash trees are infested with emerald ash borer (): 1. Striping of bark by woodpeckers searching for the larvae. 2. ⅛˝ “D-shaped” holes in the bark. 3. S-shaped tunnels beneath the bark. 4. Multiple trunk sprouts with heavy infestation.
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Robin Usborne May 20
Homeowners in Virginia urged to inspect for ‘destructive’ : via
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helene rose May 18
Why isn’t anyone really concerned about our beautiful !! Dying by the millions
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