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Greg Diamond Jul 27
Hurricane came this close to slamming into Hawaii 40 miles made all the difference
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Paul Britton Jul 26
Near miss for Honolulu as Hurricane passes just ~60 miles north of the largest population center in Hawaii.
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UW-Madison CIMSS Jul 27
Here's another look at 's close call with Hurricane via storm-centered Morphed Integrated Microwave Imagery at CIMSS (MIMIC-TC). More info & imagery at
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😷 Kim Wood Jul 27
Seven days of Hurricane : from tropical depression to major hurricane to the closest hurricane on record to track along the north side of the Hawaiian islands (closer than 2016's Hurricane Lester). Thankfully, no islands were directly impacted by the core of Douglas.
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Josh Morgerman Jul 27
Lol, does someone spray with hurricane repellent every year? Usually they fall apart & turn into decoupled scrambled eggs on approach; this one held together but missed. Core stayed offshore & hurricane impacts did not occur on islands. But close call this time.
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CYMS Cyclone Monitoring Service by Sentinel-1 Jul 27
is the first Tropical cyclone for , seen on 2020/07/25 at 03:48 UTC by during this Satellite Hurricane Observation Campaign 2020 (Wind speed & radar roughness maps)
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Ed Piotrowski Jul 27
As Hurricane passed north of Oahu Sunday, it produced a dramatic sky and a full vivid rainbow over Honolulu. Another amazing capture by Benji Barnes.
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Levi Cowan Jul 26
Hurricane seems to be moving far enough north to avoid putting Oahu directly in the eyewall, but we must watch carefully for any last minute leftward wobble. Regardless, strong winds, high surf, and flash flooding are hazards, even outside of the eyewall.
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RadarOmega Jul 26
passing just north of Oahu Island -Max Sustained Wind: 85 MPH - Min Pressure: 989 mb - Here is a look the mesoscale 2D and 3D satellite IR visualization of
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😷 Kim Wood Jul 28
The estimated intensity of decreased from 80 to 45 kt in the last 24 hours, meeting the criterion for rapid weakening. Watch the storm's convection decouple from the center of circulation in this 24-hour animation! The coldest cloud tops shift north & expose the center.
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Douglas Adams Bot Aug 1
"Don't Panic" - Adams
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Cody Fields 🥁 Jul 26
The eye of Hurricane is amazingly still evident on visible imagery as it nears the Hawaiian islands. Winds according to recon remain 85-90 mph, and hurricane winds are likely to be experienced on much of the island chain outside of the Big Island. What a rare sight.
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Cllr Deirdre FORDE Jul 25
Hands up anyone else would like to see something like this in (East) village? Maybe with a canopy 👍
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Greg Postel Jul 26
90mph hurricane closing in on Hawaii . Expect damaging wind gusts and flooding rainfall from Maui on west through Kauai, and dangerously high surf
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Craig Ceecee Jul 26
Is it just me or does the eye of (now a bit more ragged) look like a 💛 on radar? Thankfully the bulk of the weather is offshore.
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Capital Weather Gang Jul 27
Hawaii gets lucky as *just* misses; storm impacts have mostly been fairly tame:
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Daniel Dae Kim Jul 26
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Josh Morgerman Jul 26
Here’s something you don’t often see—a threatening ! will pass close to several islands from Maui to Kaua’i. If it does bring hurricane winds to Hawai’i, it’ll be only 4th storm to do so in over a century. The others: DOT 1959, IWA 1982, INIKI 1992.
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Alex Boreham Jul 26
Looks like has traveled a little more north than its previous heading in the latest pass. Good trend for Oahu as wobbles like this dictate whether the island sees eyewall effects. However, high winds, dangerous surf, & possible flooding rain still exists outside the core
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Sayaka Mori Jul 29
TS is approaching the International Dateline while weakening. If it can't cross the line with the strength of a TS, the western Pacific will likely experience NO tropical storms in July for the first time since records began in 1951. Let's keep an eye on Douglas.
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