Twitter | Search | |
Search Refresh
CreativeHistories Feb 11
How many generations of children have been traumatised by Heinrich Hoffman's 1845 cautionary tale 'Der Struwwelpeter'?
Reply Retweet Like
Colin Smith Feb 11
Endpapers from the 1973 Rupert Annual by Alfred Bestall. As a child I wanted to be in this picture. I'm now 55. I still want to be in this picture.
Reply Retweet Like
Something More Poetic Feb 11
Reply Retweet Like
Claudia Raven Feb 11
Reply Retweet Like
Caroline Robertson Feb 11
The Princess and the Goblins by George Macdonald, illustrated by Charles Folkard.
Reply Retweet Like
Independent Bookshops Feb 11
As a treat to myself last year I got a Grimm's beautifully illustrated by Arthur Rackham and I've been loving it ever since
Reply Retweet Like
Catherine Feb 11
Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame, Illustrated by E.H.Shepard.
Reply Retweet Like
Ian  Beck Feb 11
An Edmund Dulac watercolour illustration from The Tempest one of my many illustration heroes
Reply Retweet Like
Colin West Feb 10
If I had to choose just one illustration, would be this Mervyn Peake, who had the gift of being both artist & poet. And how it shows. This pic combines elements I love - music, cats & humour, & illustrates one of his own classic nonsense rhymes.
Reply Retweet Like
Jane Etheridge Feb 11
One of my childhood favourites Jan Pienkowski who is actually credited on the cover. I just love the detail
Reply Retweet Like
Louisa Glancy Feb 11
I love John Burningham's work for its bold and beautiful colour, but this one is a masterpiece for its composition. From John Burningham's book: Cannonball Simp.
Reply Retweet Like
Nik Hood Feb 11
the thrills that Jan Pienkowski’s bright and scary book illustrations brought to me as a child remain today. An actual creaking door!!
Reply Retweet Like
Tamsin Abbott Feb 11
Here’s one for for The stunning work of Mirko Hanak. I keep this book, Animal Folk Tales, with me in my workshop as I have loved it since my Dad gave it to me when I was a small child.
Reply Retweet Like
Librarimum Feb 11
My 2 year olds obsession with the moon led me to remember one of my all time favourite illustrations. It gives you that warm and fuzzy feeling every time you see it....Barbara Firth's beautiful illustrations in Can't You Sleep Little Bear. 🐻♥️
Reply Retweet Like
Colin Shelbourn Feb 11
My favourite illustration for would have to be Molesworth by Ronald Searle - any of them but this one always makes me laugh
Reply Retweet Like
Kate Celyn 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 Feb 11
I couldn’t choose just one, and I haven’t seen the wonderful Graham Oakley mentioned yet. Here are the Church Mice and Sampson the cat protesting at my delay, from The Church Mice At Bay.
Reply Retweet Like
alborozo Feb 11
For me there really is only one. E.H.Shepard. Grace, economy, fluidity, immense feeling and confidence. He has never been bettered in my eye.
Reply Retweet Like
Jenni Williams Feb 11
My favourite ever illustration has got to be this one - when Lucy first enters and meets Tumnus the Faun. It’s a truly brilliant illustration - so much of what’s to come is hinted at here. Lovely topic.
Reply Retweet Like
Sam Hicks Feb 11
Bit late to the party sorry - been in work. This Ernest H Shepard illustration from Wind in the Willows is a favourite - from the copy of the book my grandfather read to my dad and that I've now read to my children 📖 4 generations
Reply Retweet Like
Norfolk Teacher Feb 11
Thank you for all your lovely reminders of beautiful and inspiring illustrations throughout the year, my contribution is Janet and Allan Ahlberg, nostalgic book from teacher training.
Reply Retweet Like