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Oxfam International 16h
Top executives in supermarkets are cashing in big bucks $$. But too many people who produce and process our food are earning less than a fair wage & struggling to feed their families. Find out what's of your food:
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Rashmi Mistry Jul 9
Yet when we call for more value to go to those who toil of food we are often brushed aside & labelled anti-capitalist! Oxfam shows how rising inequality holds back farmers & workers from earning a decent living & ending poverty
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Oscar Alvarez Jul 31
I pledge to continue supporting the ethical work behind the food I buy! This is my personal invitation for you to take a look at 2018 report "Ripe for Change: ending human suffering in supermarket supply chains". Can you help?
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T.Majani Aug 18
FASCINATING: For products like Ecuadorian bananas, Kenyan green beans, Indian tea, Vietnamese shrimp or Thai canned tuna, the share of the consumer price in Europe and the US that reaches small-scale farmers and workers is less than 5%.
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Oxfam International Sep 2
All around the world, millions of small-scale farmers, fishers and workers who grow, catch and process our food live in poverty and suffer from inhumane treatment. Here's what you need to know:
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Rachel Wilshaw Jun 21
co-author of Ripe for Change: Ending Human Suffering in Supermarket Supply Chains lays out why Oxfam is concerned for the wellbeing of women and men producing our food yet whose suffering is often hidden.
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JShrestha Jun 23
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gawain Jun 26
🕑14 hours a day. 📅 28 days a month. That’s how long some workers on fishing boats in Southeast Asia are working, sometimes earning less than $0.50 an hour. Read more here
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Choose Right Today Sep 12
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Janice Kuharski Nov 1
We take it as a "right" that a plentiful & varied source of foods will be available to us at a modest price--never questioning what inequities & injustices lie of our consumption. We must become wise consumers to insure --a human right.
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Oxfam International Oct 20
From dealing fairly with suppliers to the living wage gap, here are some recommendations for how the supermarkets can help end the human suffering in their supply chains >>
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Oxfam International Oct 12
The seafood industry is worth more than $150bn per year. But workers in Southeast Asia face poverty wages, unsafe and unsanitary working conditions, and verbal abuse. Watch and share:
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Oxfam Headingley Jun 28
Do you know what's of food sold in your supermarkets? Millions of people across the world are working in inhumane conditions to produce our food. Read more about the movement and how you can help at:
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Oxfam in Asia Oct 19
In Asia and other parts of the world, the very people who produce our food often work for poverty wages, in awful conditions, and are struggling everyday to make ends meet. Choose to care. Break the silence.
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Alfred Nov 12
Prove yourself to yourself, not others and you know it clap your hands. RT
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Oxfam International Nov 11
Choose to care. Break the silence. Stand with the people at
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Intan A. Sunarmi Nov 10
I pledge to stand with the people
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Oxfam International Nov 9
"If a women is pregnant, she will not be hired." Fair? Indonesian workers face poverty wages, unsafe & unsanitary working conditions, and verbal abuse. Stand with the workers :
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Muthoni Muriithi Nov 7
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Oxfam International Nov 5
"Businesses face growing regulatory and consumer pressure to ensure workers in their supply chains are paid fair wages":
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