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Dr Kate Wiles Nov 11
The hashtag has become excellent reading. I submit Wynflæd’s Will - written by an anonymous scribe but on behalf of and in the voice of a woman.
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Monica H Green Nov 10
This new thread by is highlighting . (I've capitalized word breaks to aid screen readers.) I'm going to set my timer for one hour & see how much I can flag in that time. Get ready for some .
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Andrew Prescott Nov 28
According to , the Encomium Emmae Reginae 'reveals an active and forceful woman participating in the writing of history, reshaping the story of her own life in a way that suited her interests' Digitised MS is available here:
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BL Prints & Drawings Nov 17
'This Print was Etch'd & the Original Drawing was taken by Eliz. Claybourn Cossley:... for which Drawing she had the Honour of Gold Medal as a premium from the Society of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce in the year 1759'
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Dr Cordelia Beattie Nov 11
I would add the two autobiographical manuscripts by Alice Thornton (1626-1707) which the BL acquired in 2009, Add MS 88897/1 and /2 The first has been edited by Raymond Anselment:
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Andrew Prescott Nov 28
The 'Encomium Emmae Reginae', Add. MS. 33241, was written by a monk at St Bertin in n. France in about 1041 to celebrate the life of Emma, queen of K. Æthelred (r. 978-1016) and K. Cnut (r. 1016-35), and mother of K. Harthacnut and Edward the Confessor. No. 18
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BL Prints & Drawings Nov 12
One of a set of views of Canada painted on birch bark by Elizabeth Simcoe and given to George III in 1796.
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Colleen Curran Nov 11
Replying to @katemond @Ajprescott
Has anyone nominated The Book of Nunnaminster (Harley MS 2965) yet for ? If not, that's my vote especially for the connection with Ealhswith and the a confession that refers to 'peccatrice'.
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Monica H Green Nov 10
Replying to @Ajprescott @BLMedieval
... there are individual Rxs (recipes) that are ascribed to ♀. So that justifies me to make & my top choice for the virtual collection. These both have copies of the Middle English *Sickness of ♀* text. Best known for its fetal images:
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Helena Byrne Nov 9
are working on increasing female representation and will have more diversity in the displays soon
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Andrew Prescott Nov 27
The website is packed with audio clips illustrating the life, history and achievements of women all over the world. No 17 is a recording by Carol Tingey of Newar women in Nepal singing songs during a wedding ceremony in 1987:
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Sarah Werner Nov 11
I’m really enjoying , started by and with great contributions by others. There’s great stuff—treasures, even—by women at the British Library. No surprise, but great to see them highlighted instead of overlooked.
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Gender Diversity Visibility Community User Group Nov 17
Check out ! Many of the works available online.
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Monica H Green Nov 10
Okay, my timer's gone off so that's all I can contribute today to the list. I hope other folk on will contribute, as I imagine the collections--in all languages--are astoundingly rich. Curious to know more? Let me know.
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manuscripts &c. Nov 11
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Andrew Prescott Dec 1
My final is in the Treasures Gallery of the British Library, and is jawdropping: a letter from Ada Lovelace which was the first time that the principle of computer programming was described: Thx for inspiring this thread!
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Andrew Prescott Nov 30
No 19 in are from papers of Marie Stopes (1880-1958), pioneer of birth control and sex education. Add MSS 58601 and 58770 include flyers encouraging use of birth control & photos of early clinics. However, Stopes was also a eugenicist
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