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Patrik Winiger🔥🌍❄ Dec 2
Used a sophisticated manual model to project Kara Sea ice extent into January 2021. The emerging signal is quite clear.
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Zack Labe Dec 1
The extent of sea ice in the Kara Sea (, near Siberia) has fallen to a record low for the date...
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Carsten W. Mueller Nov 29
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Troy Bouffard Dec 2
Going to be an awesome DOD day with and the Alaskan Command (ALCOM). Paper (final draft) for the symposium:
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World Meteorological Organization Dec 2
2020 is set to be one of warmest years on record. Not even a cooling will put a brake on the heat. The has seen exceptional warmth, with temperatures up to 5°C above average, per WMO report
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Zack Labe Dec 3
air temperature rank by month over the satellite era - now updated through November 2020 + Ranks: 1=warmest (red), 41/42=coldest (blue) + Download visual:
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Elusive Moose Dec 3
From 😍 By Rickard E. Photography
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Zack Labe Dec 1
🚨 Average November sea ice extent was the *2nd lowest on record* This was 1,710,000 km² below the 1981-2010 average. November ice extent is decreasing at 5.13% per decade (satellite-era). Data from .
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Elusive Moose Nov 28
It's the weekend, have a great one everybody 😍 Photo Go Arctica
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Samantha Jones Nov 30
Working on maintenance for one of our analyzers today. I study dissolved CO2 in a connected lake - river - coastal ocean system in the Canadian . I have mixed Black Canadian and European settler heritage and am proud to be diverse in .
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Russia 🇷🇺 Dec 2
🐦 The gorgeous and slightly puffy shows off its silky plumage against the frosty background of the city of 🇷🇺 - largest city north of the Circle. 📸 © Natalia Yermokhina, via
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Zack Labe Nov 30
Somehow I am not surprised, yet another "anomaly" in sea ice along the coast of Siberia. Quite a year. Data from . More graphs:
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Virginijus Sinkevičius Nov 30
To some it’s tempting to see the melting Arctic as a huge opportunity. But is bad for business, people & the planet in the long run. The real opportunity lies in focusing on a safe & sustainable Arctic! Thank you for having me at the Futures Symposium.
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CIRC Dec 3
The is a harsh environment for life. Over the coming weeks, we're combining science and art to explore how some plants survive, and how is threatening this delicate environment and the plants that live here. 
To start, this is oppositifolia!
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EU Maritime & Fish Nov 30
What happens in the doesn’t stay in the Arctic: warming of poles affects the entire 🌍. We must act now, together as international community. A safe, stable, sustainable & prosperous Arctic is a key global priority - and so is for the 🇪🇺.
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Mallory Ladd 👩🏼‍🔬⚓️🌊🌎❄️ Dec 2
Permafrost THAWS. It most certainly does not melt. 🤓👩🏼‍🔬💁🏼‍♀️
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Zack Labe Nov 25
sea ice is rapidly increasing in the Hudson Bay (Canada) - it's earlier than average (particularly compared to recent years). This region experiences a large seasonal cycle and is geographically constrained (max/min extent). Data from .
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Zack Labe Dec 1
Replying to @NSIDC
2020's sea ice extent rank by month ( data since 1978/1979) ------------------------- Jan : 8th lowest Feb : 13th lowest Mar : 11th lowest Apr : 4th lowest May : 4th lowest Jun : 2nd lowest Jul : LOWEST Aug : 3rd lowest Sep : 2nd lowest Oct : LOWEST Nov : 2nd lowest
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Zack Labe Dec 2
Long-term (declining) trends in sea ice are mostly found in the outer regions of the Ocean during December (and through the rest of winter). The remaining area still becomes ice-covered. [Sea ice concentration = fraction of ice-cover (%)]
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Randall Gates Nov 27
Fall temperatures in the high have been trending up for years, and reached a new record this year. The dynamic driving this is decreased sea ice & greater release of heat from open water in fall. This trend will continue as we spiral down to an ice free summer Arctic.
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