Twitter | Search | |
Search Refresh
Nancy Parmalee Oct 19
A lot of support for my question this morning at about ethics of same sex GWAS paper but also some criticism that it was not the right forum. If you publish a high impact paper scant months before the society meeting and this is not the place then what is the right forum?
Reply Retweet Like
Mete Civelek Oct 19
Great read from ⁦⁩ and Maren Cannon on my return flight.
Reply Retweet Like
Ninad Oak Oct 22
Sketchnotes compiled here,
Reply Retweet Like
Daniel MacArthur Oct 19
Great presentation from describing gnomAD-SV, a public resource spanning all classes of structural variation in 14,891 whole genomes. Data openly available in the gnomAD browser at , and details in preprint
Reply Retweet Like
Tuuli Lappalainen Oct 15
A reminder to everyone at - let's make it a fun and safe meeting for all. If anything happens, don't hesitate to file report and/or reach out to the staff or e.g. us in the program committee who can help.
Reply Retweet Like
Heini Natri Oct 16
How to make researchers talk to each other.
Reply Retweet Like
Simran Kaur Oct 17
A huge thank you for giving me such a great opportunity to present my work at ! Its a great effort to support women in science.
Reply Retweet Like
Jon Belyeu Oct 18
Go Get Data is a package manager for genomic datasets. Check it out! Poster 1700 at
Reply Retweet Like
Mete Civelek Oct 19
If you think an important topic was not covered at please submit a session proposal by 12/12 at We want diverse views, institutions, topics, people represented in these sessions.
Reply Retweet Like
Kevin L. Keys Oct 19
If you refuse to answer the scientific questions of your peers at a society meeting, then don't expect your peers to believe your science.
Reply Retweet Like
Christine R. Beck Oct 19
Contemplating - near everyone said their favorite session was the one on poison exons with and Lori Isom. Consensus was that having an explanation of the biology in talk one was helpful for a deeper understanding of the following talks.
Reply Retweet Like
Carl Anderson Oct 18
We estimate that the mutation rate of colonic crypt stem cells is approximately doubled after IBD onset. Thus having IBD for 5 years will, on average, age stem cells in the inflamed gut by 10 years.
Reply Retweet Like
Maitreya Dunham Oct 18
planning your agenda for Saturday morning? My student Clara is giving a talk at 10:30 in session 101 on "Massively parallel functional profiling of CYP2C9 variants using a yeast activity assay" and I'd love to hear what this crowd thinks of it!
Reply Retweet Like
Aaron Quinlan Oct 18
Check out poster 1700 where Mike Cormier is presenting Go Get Data (GGD), our new tool for installing datasets with reproducible recipes.
Reply Retweet Like
Glennis Logsdon Oct 18
If you're interested in telomere-to-telomere assemblies of human chromosomes, come check out my poster (#1703) at from 1-3pm! I'll describe how I assembled difficult regions on chr8 using ultra-long (N50 = 140 kbp) reads and HiFi reads!
Reply Retweet Like
Dennis Ko Oct 18
Excited to share our work and learn more about cutting-edge approaches in human infectious disease genetics with Session 79 Ballroom C 10:30 today!
Reply Retweet Like
John Belmont Oct 16
folks, make your slides readable from the middle of the room. Lots of unmodified ggplot2 ...
Reply Retweet Like
Carl Anderson Oct 18
Truncating mutations in ARID1A, ZC3H12A and PIGR and under positive selection in the IBD colon. Only ARID1A is a known colorectal cancer driver gene. Genes in IL-17 signalling and TLR cascades are also enriched with truncating mutations and under selection.
Reply Retweet Like
Manon Oud Oct 18
Reply Retweet Like
Michael Hoffman Oct 25
Just submitted 10 pages of feedback on . is devoted to continuous improvement! If you attended, please fill out your survey before the deadline—we pay careful attention to the survey and it's resulted in many changes in the past.
Reply Retweet Like