Twitter | Search | |
Paul Haahr
Matthew & Allie’s dad, Susan’s husband, software engineer at Google, old-time liberal
4,716
Tweets
192
Following
2,956
Followers
Tweets
Paul Haahr retweeted
Yascha Mounk Jan 14
This paper proves a longstanding theory of mine: Why do Danes have better English than Germans and Portuguese better than Spaniards? Because Denmark and Portugal subtitle English TV shows, while Spain and Germany dub them.
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 12
Replying to @haahr
Holmes also shows how being a too-good salesperson can be dangerous, especially when combined with amorality and an inability to doubt oneself. A villain of Shakespearean scope and complexity, abetted by a far too credulous tech press, finally in over her head. /4 (end)
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 12
Replying to @haahr
Scariest part for me is the repeated regulatory certifications Theranos received. The system seems built on trust, that companies are not fundamentally unethical, which is probably reasonable most of the time. And then a company comes along which isn’t. /3
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 12
Replying to @haahr
I can believe that Holmes started out with good intentions, but when did she realize that the company she’d built was a fraud? She’ll probably claim never, but the pivots to using commercial analyzers and the aggressive legal strategy make that unbelievable. /2
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 12
Just finished reading Bad Blood, 's book on Theranos. As everyone says, it's excellent: a non-fiction Silicon-Valley-meets-The-Producers. I’d seen a lot as the story was coming out and there was still a lot worth reading in the book. /1
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 12
Replying to @dr_pete
That's good to know. Many pages are available. Unfortunately, a lot are not, e.g., pages 387 to 593. But, depending on which paper you want, it might be in there in full. Thanks!
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 11
Replying to @haahr
I’m sure I left off other good books, not to mention web pages, videos, online classes, etc. In any case, while the Spärck Jones collection is great for understanding the evolution of the field, any of these would be a good resource for someone learning about IR. Enjoy! /end
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 11
Replying to @haahr
Introduction to Information Retrieval by Manning, Raghavan, and Schütze is more mathematically sophisticated than the other intros and contains more on natural language processing and machine learning /7
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 11
Replying to @haahr
Information Retrieval: Implementing and Evaluating Search Engines by Büttcher, Clarke, and Cormack is a bit more advanced book, with lots of great detail on evaluation /6
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 11
Replying to @haahr
Modern Information Retrieval by Ricardo Baeza-Yates and Berthier Ribeiro-Neto is a more comprehensive introduction with more depth on “advanced subjects,” but a bit older /5
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 11
Replying to @haahr
Search Engines: Information Retrieval in Practice by Croft, Metzler, and Strohman is a very nice, practical introduction to IR /4 (with free download)
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 11
Replying to @JeffDean
The only book I’d read on the topic before I started at Google was Managing Gigabytes by Witten, Moffat, and Bell. It’s very implementation-centric, which made it the perfect thing to know before interviewing with in 2002. /3
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 11
Replying to @haahr
These are some that I own copies of, though I’ve read only parts of most. (Disclaimer: some of the authors here are friends, acquaintances, or colleagues.) /2
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 11
I guess it’s not a good idea to highly recommend a long out-of-print book from an obscure academic field. The good news is that there are plenty of great books on information retrieval for people who are interested. /1
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr retweeted
Alfred Twu Jan 8
California's new governor calls for a "Marshall Plan for affordable housing" to increase housing supply by 25%, a total of 3.5 million new homes. Depending on how you frame it, that's 9 new San Franciscos... or a couple buildings on each block. Thread 1/
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 7
Replying to @mattblaze
Very cool. Congratulations!
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 4
Innovation in dumplings: at ’s China Chilcano, Xiao Long Bao come with a device to inject vinegar without causing the dumpling to explode.
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 4
Replying to @haahr
For anyone trying to understand information retrieval, I highly recommend this collection of papers she edited. I read many of the papers in my first few years at Google, trying to get a handle on the field's evolution.
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 4
Karen Spärck Jones was the inventor of many key techniques in information retrieval, such as inverse document frequency (IDF), something I refer to at work at least daily. Great to see this (much belated) obituary.
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Haahr Jan 4
Toured the US Capitol today. Have to admit that I was shocked to learn that Mississippi and Georgia, to this day, have status of Jefferson Davis and Alexander Stephens representing their states. How can they still honor leaders of the Confederacy this way?
Reply Retweet Like