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Guardian style guide
The Guardian style guide editors on language usage and abusage, and lots more
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Guardian style guide Apr 12
Replying to @stucun
Ha! We reckon cherry bakewell is down, actually – see here for more:
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Guardian style guide Apr 11
Replying to @martintrick
Groan. (We think Joe Hart captained him in that game, actually!)
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Guardian style guide Apr 10
Fascinating piece from on 's new book on British and American English. Plus a fun language quiz!
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Guardian style guide Mar 22
Important reminder
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Guardian style guide Mar 20
Replying to @ian262
Ha. Arsey probably takes the E.
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Guardian style guide retweeted
Chris Cook Mar 15
Much appreciated. And can you check if I've left the iron on, too?
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Guardian style guide Mar 15
Replying to @sarahlyall
Ha! Which bit?
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Guardian style guide Mar 15
Replying to @timkcraig
Yeah – we make the distinction between the "team" and the "club" in that instance. Clubs – the organisation – can take the singular. "The club announced its intention to float on the stock market" or whatever. But teams are plural – Burnley *are* seventh, not Burnley is.
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Guardian style guide Mar 15
Yes, tricky, isn't it! "The Streets was" or "the Streets were"? Either is probably fine. But with more conventional groups, the singular – "Arctic Monkeys was playing its first concert since…" – sounds strange to us.
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Guardian style guide Mar 15
Yes, you're right: bands, like football teams, take a plural verb. Iron Maiden know how to rock, Coldplay are inexplicably popular, Liverpool haven't won the league for 28 years, and so on.
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Guardian style guide Mar 14
Replying to @robertsharp59
Generally, yes. We try to avoid the casual use of words likely to offend, but if essential to the story (for example, when quoting someone accused of using a slur), we'd spell it out – there's no reason to use asterisks.
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Guardian style guide Mar 13
Swear words: use when necessary to the facts of a piece, or to portray a character in an article. Thus, Rex Tillerson reportedly referred to Donald Trump as a "fucking moron". Not an "effing moron" or a "f****** moron". Asterisks are a cop-out.
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Guardian style guide Mar 9
Replying to @henrahmagix
It depends on what you want to say! The latter implies you're forbidden from commenting. The former sounds like you're saying "I don't want to get involved". We'd maybe try a different verb: suggest, advise or recommend, perhaps?
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Guardian style guide Mar 8
Replying to @mopoke
managing editor, chief executive, global director – definitely cap job titles down. We don't want to inflate egos further!
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Guardian style guide Mar 7
Replying to @dmgrattons @copybot
Ha, yes, we understand – it's confusing. In situations such as this we might use semi-colons instead.
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Guardian style guide Mar 7
Replying to @RuthWriter
The former. But we'd say "former England sprinter" if he or she once ran for the England athletics team at the Commonwealth Games, say.
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Guardian style guide Mar 6
Replying to @LoveBooksBallet
Both are correct! A good summary here:
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Guardian style guide Mar 6
Replying to @ChorltonGreen
from the style guide: either is acceptable to refer to a strip of land.
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Guardian style guide Mar 2
Replying to @UCLEnglishUsage @OED
so are we!
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Guardian style guide Mar 1
Replying to @simontcope
hyphenated: quarter-final, semi-final, play-offs etc.
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