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Genderlog
Imagining equality: a crowdsourced hub on gender, with a new guest curator each week. This week:
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Saurav Ghosh Aug 15
Replying to @genderlogindia
I see your point though. Maybe speaking about relationships etc would have made it a more open topic and a allowed healthier outlook on gender stereotypes etc.
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Genderlog Aug 16
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @NHucles1932
Absolutely!
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @nawedbelagam
Yes, absolutely. Thank you for sharing.
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @SauravAndre
yes, I hear you. One of the questions maybe we need to ask our students is if they are comfortable receiving this information as a mixed cohort? Culture also plays a significant role. Thank you for sharing your experience.
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @chintan_connect
My co-facilitator is a male colleague. All teachers seem supportive of this initiative. We received emails from male colleagues sharing how important this conversation is and how much they appreciate that the club is spearheading it.
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @YiAOrg
Less than 20% of students will be comfortable with gaining this information from their parents. Do you think schools should send consent letters to parents with an option to opt-out of the programme?
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @YiAOrg
Our students sent out a survey to students and parents to solicit their participation. One of the questions that were asked was, "Where would you prefer getting this information from?" Survey results: 56.7% an external resource person hired by the school 38.4% a trusted adult
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @YiAOrg
Sometimes these concerns are flagged by parents. Why do you think families/parents are in a better position to facilitate this exchange? That's an interesting comment. I forgot to add that at our school, we believe in including student voice in the decision-making process.
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @SauravAndre
Was it sex education or comprehensive sexuality education? Is it possible that understanding of ideas and discussion can be more enriching in a co-educational setup? Did your school hire professionals to offer this programme?
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @ModernDayEliot
It's a typo. :-) If you were to propose an inclusive sexuality education to your school administration, what challenges are you likely to encounter?
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Genderlog Aug 15
Did you ever received sexuality education training in school? What was your experience like? Do you think it is important to design an inclusive sexuality education programme as part of our school curriculum? Feel free to share your thoughts and ideas.
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @genderlogindia
To create a safe world, where people of all genders reclaim public spaces without fear, we need to make our schools safe and inclusive. Change starts at an early age.
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @genderlogindia
Patriarchy Feminism Intersectionality Consent Pleasure Privilege Masculinities Gender identities Any sexuality education course is incomplete if the above are not taught in a sensitive and age-appropriate manner.
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @genderlogindia
When we talk about male privilege, we will also talk about masculinities and how patriarchal structures impose restrictions on men too.
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @genderlogindia
Hopefully, this will also create a safe space for young boys to share their own experiences of abuse which they are forced to hide behind a false veneer of machoism.
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @genderlogindia
Through this programme, we wish to create an opportunity for allyship, engage with young men who feel that sexual harassment is not their business. We would like our boys to feel safe and share their vulnerabilities without fear.
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @genderlogindia
For example, if we do lessons on white male privilege, we hope that young, heterosexual, white, boys will be more aware of the privileges they enjoy in terms of access to public spaces. They will hopefully understand why queer people and women are afraid of public spaces.
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Genderlog Aug 15
Replying to @genderlogindia
Sexual harassment is a form of violence. We believe that understanding of privilege also helps mitigates various forms of violence.
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Genderlog Aug 15
In the proposal to the school administration, students have requested that important components of intersectionality and privilege be tied to the curriculum.
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