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Future-gifting
A simple way to help you imagine and shape your future, and that of those around you
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Future-gifting 3h
Replying to @futuregifting
So, to calculate your personal time horizon, take your age and multiply it by three. So, if you’re 30 years old in 2020, your personal time horizon is 90 years stretching from 1960 to 2050. Why not try it now?
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Future-gifting 3h
Replying to @futuregifting
1) your age; 2) the period before your birth equivalent to your age (so if you’re 30 years old in 2020, this period takes you back to 1960); and 3) the period from the present day into the future equivalent to your age (for a 30-year-old, this takes you to 2050).
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
We call this tool your 'personal time horizon'. It's made up of one component, your age, expanded out across three equal periods of time...
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
Your own lifetime can help you think more concretely about time by using your own experience of time – your lifetime – as a starting point...
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
What do I mean by this? One way to get a greater sense of the passage of time is to use your own experience of time – your lifetime – as your guide...
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
To shed light on a future that can seem obscure, start with what you already know about time and use it to develop your feel for the level of change that can happen over decades...
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
Start with something familiar When you gaze far into the future, you might feel that you lack a sense for how much things can change over the decades. You might feel like the future sits outside your (time) frame of reference...
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
If we can make the future appear more vivid and relevant – and in doing so, deepen our level of connectedness with it – perhaps we can improve the clarity and effectiveness of our future-thinking?
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
So how could we make the future more vivid and relevant? ...
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
More broadly, research suggests that imagining new changes in the future (sometimes called ‘prospection‘) is simply harder than recalling past changes.
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
A growing body of studies have examined the role of vividness and its role in tilting people’s behaviour away from instant gratification and towards longer-term benefits (for example, Hershfield et al’s seminal study).
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @ktmpaterson
...art can help us make things more vivid, and challenge our perception of time. Take works by deep-time artist for example...
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
...In 1984, philosopher Derek Parfit wrote that “when we imagine pains in the further future, we imagine them less vividly, or believe confusedly that they will somehow be less real, or less painful”. ...
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
...A further reason could be that the pictures our minds’ conjure of the future just aren’t compelling enough.
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
...The main reason we find future-thinking hard is the seductive draw of the present. We favour smaller rewards received right now over larger rewards that are delayed. This phenomenon is known as ‘temporal discounting’...
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
...If you’re asked to think about the world in, say, 30 years’ time, it can feel very remote and abstract. It can look like little more than a fuzzy spot on the horizon that feels far removed from your own experience of life today...
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
We should recognise that thinking about the future over any time horizon – long or short – isn’t always easy...
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
In other words, we don’t think about the future beyond a couple of decades. This suggests that a lot of people aren’t thinking at all about great chunks of their lives to come: parent- and grandparenthood, their middle-age or retirement...
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @romankrznaric
In his book “The Good Ancestor: How to think long-term in a short-term world”, public philosopher quotes survey data to show for most people “the future goes dark after 15 to 20 years.”
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Future-gifting 4h
Replying to @futuregifting
On any given day, you and I will think about the future for around one of every seven hours we spend thinking. However, despite thinking a lot about what’s to come, it turns out that we struggle to picture the future more than a few decades ahead.
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