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Dr. Rhonda Patrick
I'm a Ph.D in biomedical science/expert on nutritional health, brain & aging.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick 9h
Kale supplementation increased heat shock proteins, lowered oxidative damage, and suppressed cognitive decline by improving spatial and learning memory in mice with a premature aging phenotype.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 21
Replying to @BrockWahl
Observational study, but literally the same week this came out…
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 21
Replying to @foundmyfitness
Exercise, which increases mitochondrial biogenesis (the growth of new healthy mitochondria), has also been shown to improve skin aging.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 21
Age-related skin wrinkles and hair loss were reversed by turning off a gene responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction which also leads to age-related diseases (mouse study).
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 20
A mother’s gut microbiome linked to immune activation and with increased susceptibility of her offspring to developing autism spectrum disorder (animal study).
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 19
Replying to @foundmyfitness
To learn more about time-restricted eating and cancer, check out my podcast with Dr. Ruth Patterson. She discusses how eating earlier in the day and only during an 11-hour window, can decrease breast cancer risk and recurrence by as much as 36%.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 19
People who eat dinner before 9 pm or wait at least two hours before going to sleep have a 20% lower risk of breast and prostate cancer.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 18
Getting bright light in the morning could be just as important for improving sleep as avoiding blue light exposure at night. After exposure to daytime bright light, evening use of a tablet for two hours did not affect sleep in healthy young students.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 16
Replying to @foundmyfitness
The nine biomarkers that identified "phenotypic age" included: albumin, creatinine, glucose, C-reactive protein, lymphocyte percent, mean cell volume, red blood cell distribution width, alkaline phosphatase, and white blood cell count.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 16
Nine blood biomarkers used to identify a "phenotypic age" which was highly predictive of remaining life expectancy among both healthy and unhealthy populations independent of chronological age.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 15
Pregnant women given a multivitamin supplement starting in the first trimester had children with a 2.16-point higher IQ and 4.29-point higher verbal comprehension index compared to those in the control group (randomized controlled trial).
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 12
Replying to @KepherOtieno7 @Dr_Epel
Podcast scheduled with soon! Lots of telomere discussion, I’m sure. 😀
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 12
Replying to @foundmyfitness
To learn more about what causes cellular senescence, how it accelerates aging and plays a role in age-related diseases, and possible ways to prevent it...check out my podcast with Dr. Judi Campisi.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 12
Transplanting senescent cells into young mice caused physical dysfunction and decreased lifespan when transplanted into old mice. On the other hand, selective clearance of senescent cells increased lifespan by 36% & improved physical function in old age.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 11
Replying to @joekleca
Good question. This study was done in healthy volunteers not experiencing pain.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 11
When taken prior to sleep, ibuprofen and aspirin disrupted sleep by increasing the number of awakenings and time spent awake and decreasing sleep efficiency compared to placebo. Ibuprofen also delayed the onset of deep sleep.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 10
Replying to @HuuNghiQuach
Valter’s work on prolonged fasting is one of the reasons most even know it has value in the first place! In my opinion, FMD is a logical progression in some ways to get the “tech” to the masses.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 10
Replying to @rhettmc @LaukkanenJari
Great interview with the author of some of the best scientific work demonstrating the benefits of sauna use ... Alzheimer's/dementia risk... All-cause and heart-related death risk...
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 10
Replying to @rhettmc
I tend to think that a lot of the benefits probably have to do with thermal load. If you're able to get as subjectively hot from an infrared sauna (or steam room) as you would get after 20 mins in a Finnish sauna, it's probably a good enough approximation. I like steam rooms.
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick Jul 10
Replying to @rhettmc
Most of the really good research coming out of Finland uses the Finnish sauna, which does have some steam (from pouring water on rocks). The temperature is going to be higher than the vast majority of infrared saunas at around 175ºF. Finns call infrared saunas "warming rooms."
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