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UF FFL Program
The Florida-Friendly Landscaping(TM) Program at the University of Florida.
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UF FFL Program retweeted
SJRWMD Jul 24
Stormwater swales are either man-made or natural areas shaped to allow water to be quickly absorbed into the ground or to allow the water to flow to other waterways. Learn about stormwater systems at
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UF FFL Program retweeted
FL Master Gardeners Jul 23
It’s ridiculously hot. But there are still plants that can add new life to your landscape right now — heat-tolerant annuals like coleus and vinca can add color to any Florida yard:
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UF FFL Program retweeted
FL Master Gardeners Jul 20
Attract hummingbirds, zebra longwing butterflies, and more with native firebush. Heat- and drought-tolerant, it can be grown throughout . Learn more Gardening Solutions:
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UF FFL Program retweeted
SJRWMD Jul 16
Do you know what water management district you live in? It’s easy to find out. Searchable tool at
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UF FFL Program retweeted
FL Master Gardeners 9 Jul 18
Killer sun, dude! With soil solarization, a sheet of plastic is used to cover the soil surface, allowing the soil to reach temperatures that are lethal to many pests and weeds.
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UF FFL Program retweeted
FL Master Gardeners 6 Jul 18
Plant of the Month: Australian tree fern. Great for shaded gardens in South and Central Florida or well-protected areas farther north, this giant can lend your landscape an exotic touch.
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UF FFL Program retweeted
Southwest Fl Water 6 Jul 18
How much rain did your area receive in June? Find out from the monthly report.
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UF FFL Program retweeted
Southwest Fl Water 5 Jul 18
Catch those summer rains and help conserve water. Here are 5 steps to building a rain barrel.
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UF FFL Program retweeted
FL Master Gardeners 29 Jun 18
Friday Flowers: Hairy Leafcup. Another name for this native but uncommon wildflower is bear's foot, due to its deeply lobed foliage that some think resembles a bear's paw.
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UF FFL Program 27 Jun 18
It's National Mosquito Control Awareness Week
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UF FFL Program 26 Jun 18
Looking for a heat tolerant edible? Try growing Okra
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UF FFL Program 25 Jun 18
DYK that luna moths only live for a week after leaving the cocoon?
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UF FFL Program retweeted
Florida Wildflower 22 Jun 18
!Carolina horsenettle (Solanum carolinense):summer-blooming found along roadsides and in disturbed sites. Pollinated primarily by bumble bees, but many insects visit its flowers. Photo:Stacey Matrazzo
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UF FFL Program retweeted
FL Master Gardeners 21 Jun 18
Buttonbush is an eye-catching native plant that can be found in wetlands, and it could be a standout for your bog garden. Learn more about bog gardens at Gardening Solutions:
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UF FFL Program retweeted
FL Master Gardeners 19 Jun 18
Gopher tortoises are a keystone species, meaning that many other species in the ecosystem rely on these gentle reptiles to survive. Do you what to do if you come across one? (Photo: USDA)
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UF FFL Program 15 Jun 18
Be aware of the invasive Cuban Tree Frog!
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UF FFL Program retweeted
Florida DEP News 13 Jun 18
DYK: DEP laboratory scientists perform analyses on more than 140,000 water samples in an average year, which includes analyses of samples collected to ensure the health of Florida’s springs. Learn more at .
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UF FFL Program retweeted
FL Master Gardeners 11 Jun 18
Beautiful, low-maintenance, and Florida-friendly, prickly pear is also edible! Not that it’s going to give up its fruit easily... on Gardening Solutions (photo: Gary Knox, all rights reserved)
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UF FFL Program retweeted
FL Master Gardeners 9 Jun 18
Did you know that beach sunflower turns to follow the sun? Learn more about this lovely native and more in this month’s Neighborhood Gardener:
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UF FFL Program retweeted
SJRWMD 6 Jun 18
Rain sensors need annual maintenance; wet weather is the perfect time to check yours. If it is working then your system will not run during rainy days.
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