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Fred Ehrsam
. Previously co-founder .
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Fred Ehrsam 4h
Replying to @nayafia @rivatez and 2 others
Yep, hard problem. Augur model has votes bubble up to more and more people with skin in the game, and ultimately the universe can fork if no global agreement can be reached.
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Fred Ehrsam 5h
Lack of incentives to replicate research seems like a big problem. What about: Bounties for replicating research. A deposit is required to validate/invalidate an experiment and collect bounty. If later found you validated/invalidated incorrectly, deposit is taken or slashed.
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Fred Ehrsam Jan 15
., an easy way to trade Augur markets, is now live. With Grin markets (!):
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Fred Ehrsam Jan 15
Replying to @Aella_Girl
Or the weighted average of the desires of people with money to spend, adjusted by their willingness to spend it.
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Fred Ehrsam Jan 9
Thrilled to have , one of the brightest minds in cryptoeconomics, join the team. Welcome Dan!
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Fred Ehrsam Jan 7
Replying to @FEhrsam
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Fred Ehrsam Jan 5
Replying to @scottastevenson
Yes; and on some level, what’s the difference?
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Fred Ehrsam Jan 5
Replying to @maraoz @ramez
Started last week :)
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Fred Ehrsam Jan 5
Replying to @FEhrsam
IMO, the most exciting potential technological advancement in our lifetimes (from a human-centric perspective) sits at the intersection: the direct brain-computer interface.
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Fred Ehrsam Jan 5
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Fred Ehrsam Jan 5
Empirically, digital worlds are humanity's largest frontier. The average American now spends more than half their waking hours looking at screens. Meanwhile, the frontiers of the physical world haven't changed much since 1969.
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Fred Ehrsam Jan 5
Replying to @FEhrsam
Another big pro for gaming: it is active learning and learning is best done through direct experience. Compare to listening to a teacher lecture, reading a book, or watching a video (all passive learning by default).
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Fred Ehrsam Jan 4
Replying to @brian_armstrong
Probably a deeper lesson here
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Fred Ehrsam Dec 30
Replying to @FEhrsam
A lot of this learning will probably happen in games. They're great testing grounds because they establish real value for items (there's skin in the game) while making the cost of failure feel low (developers and players can take more risk and try to break systems).
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Fred Ehrsam Dec 30
Replying to @FEhrsam
Why? Most of the same reasons software moves faster than hardware: - Cost of creating a new crypto system near 0 vs. nearly impossible to start a new government or central bank - Fast iteration - Many ideas tried in parallel (via forking or new codebase)
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Fred Ehrsam Dec 30
I continue to believe we'll learn more about governance and economic systems from blockchains than from the "real world" in the coming years. Microverse is an early example of this: a blockchain-based game that tests Harberger taxation h/t
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Fred Ehrsam Dec 30
👋
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Fred Ehrsam Dec 28
Replying to @alitamaseb
Said another way: do 2 founder or 1 founder startups have a higher chance of becoming worth $1bn?
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Fred Ehrsam Dec 28
Replying to @alitamaseb
This is great. A suggestion: it would be helpful if a lot of these stats were expressed in % of success. Ex: interesting that 35% of $1bn startups had 2 founders and 20% had 1, but what % of 2 founder/1 founder startups become worth $1bn?
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Fred Ehrsam Dec 26
"The most useful piece of learning... is to unlearn what is untrue" - Antisthenes
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