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Hugh Osborn
Exoplanet-hunting astronomer at . Occasional science blogger/podcaster (for ). Expert procrastinator. Views my own
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Hugh Osborn 4h
To have any indication of life, we'd need a spectrum. It doesn't transit, so to do that means imaging it. However, these planets are very close to their stars, and extrapolating from current observations, we'd probably need a telescope with an 80m mirror before that's possible
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Hugh Osborn 7h
GJ 406 apparently
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Hugh Osborn 7h
Yeah, this was about my limit too, plus maybe Ross 128 & eps Eridani. Lalande 21185 is GJ 411 on that list btw, and I missed Wolf 359 as it's not on yet, woops.
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Hugh Osborn 8h
Replying to @SeanHMcMahon
This emoji: 🥦
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Hugh Osborn 8h
Given today's two new nearby , here's a lazy quiz. How many stars with planets can you name in the local neighbourhood (i.e. within 15 light years/4.6 parsec). GO!
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Hugh Osborn 8h
Replying to @Nairda_K
Thanks for the link. I understand the difficulties. Are there many M8/M9 stars bright enough to be useful? Of the 2200 stars in the CARMENES GTO sample, only 19 are >M8. I'm worried the astro community is currently spending a lot of time/effort on NIR planet-finding spectrographs
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Hugh Osborn 8h
Replying to @exohugh
The paper is here: … & well worth a read! It's so exciting how RV surveys are beginning to populate our local neighbourhood with small planets. Of the stars within 16ly, the last 5yrs has revealed 17 new planets, all found with RVs, and all but one <10Me.
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Hugh Osborn 8h
Replying to @exohugh
This is a very red star - it shines mostly in the infra-red. CARMENES observes in both VIS & NIR but was built specifically to find RV planets using this IR light (as were NIRSP, SPIROU, HPF, etc)... Except they're struggling. NIR spectra don't seem to produce precise RVs😕
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Hugh Osborn 8h
Replying to @exohugh
Photometry reveals that planet b doesn't transit (and c is unlikely to either). However, Teegarden's Star is in a cool position where it could see Earth transit... in 35 years time! This plot showing the star passing through each of our system planet's "transit shadows" is 🔥.
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Hugh Osborn 9h
There's a couple of cool new out today from . They are both a bit bigger than 1 Earth Mass and orbit in the habitable zone of Teegarden's Star, an extremely small red dwarf only 12 light years away!
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Hugh Osborn 11h
I get the feeling that 10 years ago St. John's (where I believe ~70% of students and probably a large number of staff too were privately educated) maybe didn't quite share the same goal... I hope that's changed now though!
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Hugh Osborn 11h
In the 5 years before my 28th birthday, I went to a single wedding. In the 2 months since I've received four invites to four weddings in four countries. The curse was true...
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Hugh Osborn 23h
Yeah, NatSci might've been different to pure Maths/Physics. In many of the interview interviews I found I was being asked more about my knowledge base than my "ability to research/problem solve", though. I also messed up & picked almost the richest of rich-kid colleges haha.
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Hugh Osborn Jun 17
Replying to @poshandcrabby
Haha I hope you haven't beaten my La Silla segments :P. Unfortunately I'm not at EWASS though (even though it's just up the road in Lyon :( )
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Hugh Osborn Jun 17
Replying to @cplberry
My experiences were from Cambridge/St Johns college in 2009. Both the college (extremely low state school numbers) and the year (pre-recent improvements) probably factored into my experience. I hope things have improved now.
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Hugh Osborn Jun 17
I can relate; they look so planety at first viewing! Until you calculate the primary density... I have like 20 giant-MS binaries from K2 that appear as single transits (sometimes with secondaries) if anyone wants to model them..? :P
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Hugh Osborn Jun 17
Replying to @exohugh
Obviously I could have done more. But I also realise that the system meant I was being compared to those from private education & was destined to lose. In hindsight the uni you go to is unimportant - It's how you use your time there. I'm very glad I chose UCL
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Hugh Osborn Jun 17
Replying to @exohugh
In these cases, the interviewers probably had asked the same questions to ten people that day, 7 of whom both had that knowledge and had confidence thanks, in part, to the money their parents paid for their education.
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Hugh Osborn Jun 17
Replying to @exohugh
My state school offered a single timetabled way to do the 3 sciences &, despite the fact I loved geography, I had to drop it to do Physics. This isn't true for well-staffed private schools. Similarly, private schools even offer A-levels in Geology which I never even knew existed!
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Hugh Osborn Jun 17
Replying to @exohugh
The worst was when a Prof handed me a mottled rock & said "tell us about it". I was completely at sea. I floundered for a few minutes, they despaired, & my confidence ebbed away sure of failure. But I'd literally done zero geology at school. How could they expect me to know this?
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