Twitter | Search | |
reuben strayer
Emergency medicine updates of interest to emergency clinicians. Discussion requires more than 140 characters; post comments/Qs to
272
Tweets
50
Following
8,787
Followers
Tweets
reuben strayer Jan 15
Replying to @emergencypdx
From the acid-base chapter in the latest edition of Rosen's. A chapter written with extraordinary clarity, filled with surprising insights and sparkling humor.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Jan 4
Neither. From the following letter to the editor: "In the absence of a documented beneficial effect on outcome, CP appears to be more a ritual than an effective measure."
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Dec 30
After thousands of years of variability in the treatment of epistaxis, I feel like we're coming to a consensus.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Dec 25
For christmas, I asked santa for a universal patient algorithm.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Dec 22
“We are not the problem, leave us alone” is the wrong message. It’s not about total # Rx. ED prescribes more to opioid naive patients–every time, a roll of the dice: a small % will be harmed and the harms can be devastating. Always weigh benefit:harm.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Dec 21
The Harms of Opioids. Every time you consider discharging a patient with an opioid prescription, weigh the likelihood of benefit and harm, as you would with an anticoagulant, antibiotic, or anything else. Every patient discharged with an opioid Rx must be counseled on harms.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Dec 19
Ketamine wound irrigation very effective vs. systemic ketamine and placebo in 90 thyroidectomy patients. In the ED: Bartholin's abscess, large lacs/avulsions, other particularly painful wounds, maybe bad burns? No psychoperceptual effects in this cohort.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Nov 25
I estimate the incidence of confusion among emergency clinicians regarding nystagmus and central vs peripheral vertigo is approximately 100%. or maybe it's just me and I'm projecting. anyway thank you, Dr. Edlow, for this.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Nov 16
The Fourteen Year Old and Her Red Tablet a tale of agitation, with commentary.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Nov 2
NEJM Journal Watch Emergency Medicine says IM Ketamine "is not a good first line option for severely agitated patients." The author of the study they reviewed doesn’t agree.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Oct 20
Much of what we were taught about opioids was wrong, and emergency clinicians must be opioid experts. Drs. Wightman and Perrone provide an authoritative and emergency medicine-focused review in the latest chapter: Opioids.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Oct 5
Current EM Clinics is _Vascular Disorders_ and features a particularly well-written piece on Aortic Dissection.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Sep 18
Prescribing in pregnancy is more fear-based than evidence-based. Expert guidance in the latest chapter.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Sep 2
Old ortho hardware, chronic wound at hardware, now presents with new abscess. CT showed no tracks or collections, so might as well I&D.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Aug 8
How I do the pause. Almost every time, someone later approaches me and says, thank you for doing that.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Aug 3
Plan B (levonorgestrel) is well-named but less effective at preventing pregnancy than ulipristal acetate (Ella).
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Jul 11
International consensus statement on use of the term NITRATE vs. NITRITE in urine dipstick testing.
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Jul 8
Authoritative list of PE risk factors. Smoking not a RF, pregnancy risk highest postpartum, and other zingers. from
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer Jun 1
How we got here: our latest chapter is The Opioid Epidemic: A Brief History by &
Reply Retweet Like
reuben strayer May 29
confirmation of endotracheal tube placement can be harrowing when not going as planned. know what works and what doesn't.
Reply Retweet Like