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Philip Wood 6 Jun 18
An important comment here. We could add that there was already a translation movement from Greek to in the seventh century at (eg.) Qeneshre. This expertise provided a framework for translations from Greek to Syriac to Arabic in Baghdad in ninth century
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Philip Wood 6 Jun 18
Replying to @DrPhilipWood
Ibn al-Nadim's Fihrist gives a wonderful evocation of the cosmopolitanism of the Baghdad of his day. He names some 61 translators: 38 nestorian, 1 maronite, 9 jacobite, 11 melkite, 1 sabaean, 1 'Persian'.
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Elaine van Dalen
but this diversity isn't something ignored in contemporary scholarship, it is well acknowledged; the major works on the translation movement i.e. Gutas and Saliba, all stress the Syriac/Christian aspect
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Guillaume Dye 6 Jun 18
Oh, I would not really agree about Gutas. To my mind, he has a tendency, to downplay the Syriac movement Philip is referring to. Good corrective to this in Jack 's excellent dissertation
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Elaine van Dalen 6 Jun 18
I agree that Gutas downplays the role of the Christians before the Abbasids. Yet he too stresses the religious and ethnic diversity of both patrons and translators who took part in the Abbasid movement itself, which is the period Philip refers to with Ibn al-Nadīm's list
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Amin Nayebpour 6 Jun 18
Guillaume, can you direct me to that dissertation?
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Guillaume Dye 6 Jun 18
You can find, I think, in various places, for example here:
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Amin Nayebpour 6 Jun 18
Syriac/Christian aspect, yes—Persian/Zoroastrian tradition no. The key link is Ibn Miqaffa’
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