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Elaine van Dalen
there is a story in Ibn Waḥshiyya’s Nabatean Agriculture that shares some remarkable similar tropes with the story of Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden, but is mostly very different. I'll share it and would love to hear if anyone's come across this type of mythology elsewhere
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Elaine van Dalen 6 Jun 18
Replying to @elainevdalen
First, the Adam in the Agriculture is not the first man but considered to be an early prophet (although his prophethood is debated by certain sages in the book) who has learned everything there is to know about plants from the moon (which those same sages reject as impossible)
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Elaine van Dalen 6 Jun 18
Replying to @elainevdalen
now there was a people living in the "area of the Sun" (Iqlīm al-Shams), described as the best country on the face on the earth, who only ate grapes, raisins, and certain birds, but not bread.
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Elaine van Dalen 6 Jun 18
Replying to @elainevdalen
This was not because they were gluten intolerant, but because their barley and wheat grew together into one tall tree, from which they were forbidden to eat (!), because it was filled with snakes (!)
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Elaine van Dalen 6 Jun 18
Replying to @elainevdalen
Luckily Adam visits and shows them how to deal with the snakes, teaches them to make bread and builds them an oven. Once these people eat the bread they become smart, have new ideas, and realise they are naked (!). They become ashamed and Adam teaches them how to make clothes.
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Elaine van Dalen 6 Jun 18
Replying to @elainevdalen
Now they begin to worship Adam as their king, which angers their own king, who becomes jealous and upset that they now eat bread, have become smart and have started to be ashamed of each other's nakedness.
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Elaine van Dalen 6 Jun 18
Replying to @elainevdalen
Adam orders them to ban the king into the wilderness, which - in a rather larger move away from the Genesis story - they do. Then Adam leaves too because he misses his own country, which is the end of the story.
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Elaine van Dalen 6 Jun 18
Replying to @Njmat_alkotob
Thanks for the reference I will have a look!
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Yahya Yakup 6 Jun 18
Replying to @elainevdalen
Can I possibly expect a tweet chain, Elaine, on the elusive "Sabi'ūn" in the fascinating Nabatean Agriculture? I think I came across in Maimonides's Guide a most interesting reference to it.
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Yahya Yakup 6 Jun 18
Replying to @elainevdalen
One more thing, if I'm not being too much, and seeing that your credentials are in the thick of the study area, what do you think about the likely relationship between the Arabic (Syriac? Ethiopic?) namus and Greek nomos?
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