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EconplusDal
Head of Economics, YouTube Economics Tutor, Roller Coaster Enthusiast, Food Lover. Previously Economics Teacher at Bromsgrove School
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EconplusDal Jan 21
Impact of Chinese Slowdown (6% yearly growth rates) on Developing Countries; 1) Less export demand & greater protectionism impacting growth/unemployment thus slower poverty alleviation 2) Less inward FDI impacting job creation, productive capacity, infrastructure and tax revenue
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EconplusDal Jan 21
Impact of Chinese Slowdown (6% yearly growth rates) on UK; 1) Less demand for UK exports worsening the UK’s current account deficit 2) Less inward FDI impacting both SR and LR UK growth 3) Less demand for UK Debt so harder to finance budget and current account deficits
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EconplusDal Jan 21
A lot of headlines like these recently - important to stay aware of implications of Chinese growth slowdowns on the UK and global economy. Important to link to both developed and developing countries.
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EconplusDal Jan 15
Crazy excited to announce my Easter A Level Revision Mastery Workshops in London & B'ham! Such a unique chance to revise Economics with me & push towards the top grades like students achieved last year. Be sure to book your place here before spaces go!
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EconplusDal Jan 13
There were 3.7m more workers in 2019 than in 2009, an annual employment growth rate of 1.2% - the fastest since 1950. But the nature of the job market has changed with stellar figures masking the reality of poor quality jobs and in work poverty
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EconplusDal Jan 13
Productivity grew at an annual rate of 0.6% in the 2010s, compared with 1.1% in the previous decade and more than 2% in any other post war decade. Poor productivity growth has impacted living standards by dampening wage growth
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EconplusDal Jan 13
Per Capita GDP Growth in the last decade at 1.1% has averaged less than half the rate of the post war period. 2010s marked the first decade since the 1940s without a recession - growth has been steady but sluggish
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EconplusDal Jan 8
Core 2020 UK Macro themes are crucial, could easily be exam material; 1) Brexit 2) Trade Negotiations 3) Weak Pound 4) Balance of Payments Imbalances 5) Foreign Aid 6) Higher or Lower Interest Rates? 7) End of Austerity and Boosts to Gov. Spending 8) Productivity and Wage Growth
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EconplusDal Jan 8
Core 2020 UK Micro themes are crucial, could easily be exam material; 1) Housing Market Issues 2) Energy Price Cap 3) Plastic Pollution 4) NHS Funding 5) Gig Economic Impact on the Labour Market and Competition 6) Big Mergers 7) Nationalisation vs Privatisation
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EconplusDal Jan 7
Good to be aware of the core 2020 Global Economy themes, could easily be exam material; 1) Higher or Lower Interest Rates 2) End of Austerity in the West? 3) Trade Wars 4) Chinese Slowdown 5) Inequality and Disparities 6) Environmental Sustainability 7) Brexit
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EconplusDal Jan 7
Happy New Year everyone! Hope the break was relaxing & productive. With early exams, this term is pivotal. Ensure 1) Notes are made 2) Content is mastered by topic 3) Questions are practised per topic area. Use videos on the channel; loads of help to come from me
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EconplusDal Dec 18
Have a fantastic break everyone but put in hard Economics revision too. Stay motivated & productive by setting daily targets to; 1) Master content by making perfect notes 2) Practise a variety of past paper questions topic by topic. You’ll reap the huge rewards come April! 😎💪
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EconplusDal Dec 11
Evidence proves the weak pound does little to narrow a current account deficit and therefore supply side policies are desperately needed to resolve structural weaknesses in the UK economy and to re-balance the economy.
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EconplusDal Dec 11
PED of UK exports is very low; 1) Low Manufacturing Base 2) High value added exports that are not sensitive to price changes. The PED of Imports is price inelastic; 1) Necessities 2) Lack of domestic substitutes 3) Integrated supply chains and contract agreements.
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EconplusDal Dec 11
Export revenues rose slightly after the depreciation implying a low PEDx. Import expenditure rose implying the PEDm<1 with a J-Curve effect in the immediate aftermath. The M-L Condition has since been satisfied but the CA Deficit has narrowed to still 4.6% GDP. Not much impact!
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EconplusDal Dec 11
The pound remains weak despite recent gains. Tomorrow could be another very volatile day. As economists be sure to know about the impact of the weak pound over the last few years
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EconplusDal Dec 10
Very interesting chart...
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EconplusDal retweeted
Anathi Tom Dec 4
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EconplusDal Dec 4
Determinants of the Natural Rate of U (consisting of structural, frictional and seasonal U); 1) Generous Benefits System 2) High Levels of Income Tax 3) Excessive Labour Market Regulation 4) Poor Transport and Housing Infrastructure 5) Lack of In Work Training Programmes
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EconplusDal Dec 4
Many countries aim for full employment i.e. unemployment at the natural rate. But Natural rates of unemployment can differ wildly between countries. Some notable estimates; 1) USA 4% 2) UK 4.25% 3) Spain 12% 4) France 8-10%
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