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Jack Horner
dyslexic dinosaur paleontologist; Presidential Fellow, Chapman University; MacArthur Fellow; National Geographic Explorer; Jurassic Park & J World advisor
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Jack Horner Sep 17
Replying to @Au36446039Ethan
Start with archaeology! :)
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Jack Horner Sep 10
Replying to @DudesInterview
👍🏻
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Jack Horner Sep 10
When so much of California skies are orange with smoke, here in Orange, California the skies are pretty clear with visibility of our far off mountains. Photo taken with my Mavic Air 2 from directly above my house looking NE at our main Chapman University campus.
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Jack Horner Sep 7
Replying to @DavidQuammen
That’s pretty darn good David, I think I would have guessed you were a 5. I’m a 3, although not certain my “sky diving” counts as actual sky diving...
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Jack Horner Sep 2
Replying to @flamesonice
He looks like he is well on his way! :)
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Jack Horner Aug 31
Replying to @AnshThePaleoGuy
Good question but no, theropods are relatively easy to age because their long bone cortex tissues are thick enough to record a few annual lines, and those missing can be retro-calculated.
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Jack Horner Aug 29
Replying to @Kaijurassicart1
Lol
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Jack Horner Aug 29
I agree wholeheartedly!“Research at a PUI has "sparked joy" even for a person like myself lacking a lab, an office, and being part time. With our terrific Chapman students, together with former students and colleagues, research can be maintained at the highest of academic levels.
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Jack Horner Aug 21
Yes
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Jack Horner Aug 11
Replying to @Cfyz0994
jhorner@Chapman.edu
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Jack Horner Aug 9
Replying to @Au36446039Ethan
Montana just doesn’t yield the same vastness of outcrops of the same stratigraphic level. Montana has some of the right levels and they are very productive but not to accessable...
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Jack Horner Aug 8
It seems a lot of us are publishing a higher than normal number of research articles this year. Is it too corny to call it a pandemic of papers?
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Jack Horner Aug 6
Replying to @Blackrose_uk
Mimicking is often used to either deter predators or attract potential prey. Certainly possible some dinosaurs used similar strategies.
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Jack Horner retweeted
Fumiko Hoeft Aug 4
Excited to have a conversation with Jack Horner a fabulous paleontologist known by most for being the scientific director of and ; the two most creative, smart and fun people I know.
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Jack Horner Aug 2
That’s an interesting paper with an interesting hypothesis based on chemistry, but does not falsify the hypothesis that is based on a skeleton of Tenontosaurus found with nearly a dozen Deinonychus teeth. One does not supersede the other.
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Jack Horner Aug 2
I’m curious what the “evidence” is to suggest a lack of parental care in any animal that cannot be directly observed.
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Jack Horner Aug 2
I think there is more the sufficient evidence for “pack hunting” in this one paper: Maxwell, W. D.; Ostrom, J.H. (1995). "Taphonomy and paleobiological implications of Tenontosaurus–Deinonychus associations". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 15 (4): 707–712.
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Jack Horner Aug 1
Have you ever examined the hand claws of a Saurornitholestes or Deinonychus? They are laterally compressed, blade-shaped and recurved like a cat’s claws, certainly climbing capable. I have no doubt they could grab something, but I’m also convinced they could scale their prey.
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Jack Horner Jul 31
These small raptorial dinosaurs with recurved claws and bladed, serrated teeth, defy the notion that a dinosaur apex predator needs to have been large. Just imagine, just one of these clinging to your back, slashing and feeding on you while you thrashed helplessly.
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Jack Horner Jul 26
Making some progress, slowly but surely!
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