Twitter | Search | |
Dustin P. Walsh
Senior reporter for covering economic issues, big and small. Infographics and data. Known curmudgeon, alleged vampire.
8,125
Tweets
1,229
Following
2,735
Followers
Tweets
Dustin P. Walsh 4h
TFW you realize tomorrow is Friday and it's officially summer.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh 9h
Ronaldo > Messi.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh 14h
Should be noted that Koch Industries is the majority owner of Auburn Hills-based Guardian Industries - of Roger and Me Fame and formerly owned by the Davidson family.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 20
Reeducation through labor.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 20
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 20
Replying to @rooprajfox2 @J9media
Yes, I do believe this is most often the case of a media-unaware client. I think, however, PR folks struggle to help their clients understand just how little time we want from them. You can ALWAYS find 5 mins. in your day. They seem to think it takes a whole day to talk to me.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 20
But...but...Russia deserves the
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
Replying to @ReneCizio
Of course. It's tough being the middle man.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
Replying to @MickiMaynard
Soy prices have been historically high in recent years. Obviously there's a whole host of other factors, but my guess would be that farmer won the corn subsidy lotto and didn't need to plant. Or, alternatively, that land became too expensive to lease vs. input costs.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
60 percent, or $700M, of Michigan's soybean crops are exported.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
By default this would, of course, add thousands of dollars (hundreds?) to our trade *surplus* with Canada.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
As a journalist I'm often asked what PR professionals do wrong. Here's an example: "I've got this thing by this person. Want to report it?" "Yes, actually I would. Can I speak to this person about this thing soon?" "Oh, great! I'll get right back to you!" 48 HRs later. Nothing.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
So, in some weird way, we should be thanking Ford for operating such terrible working conditions in the early 1900s, thus requiring ridiculous pay for the time to keep the lines running. In turn, creating the middle class. Detroit is a weird, wild, interesting, confounding place.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
Ford calculated his training costs for new workers, production stoppages and improving safety. It was simply cheaper to pay workers more. LOTs more. In turn, conditions seemed a bit better for the money. More pay, more happy workers.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
In 1913, Ford hired 52,000 workers for 14,000 jobs. The working conditions at the Rouge plant were so deplorable and the work so tough, turnover was insanely high. Production halted on some occasions. To keep the lines running, Ford more than doubled pay.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
The lionized Henry Ford raised workers wages from $2.25 per day to $5 a day in 1913, allowing line workers to earn enough to afford a Ford car. This, of course, was a great, great thing. But Henry didn't do it for altruistic reasons.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
Naturally Ford's Rouge plant is going to come up. It's been long heralded as the single operation that unilaterally created the middle class.
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
The car company graveyard is long and littered with good intentions. Ford stayed relevant by being bold early on and innovating the workforce. Let's hope the Depot can do the same (with some caveats).
Reply Retweet Like
Dustin P. Walsh Jun 19
On this Juneteenth in 2018, 153 years after the announcement was made that slavery in the U.S. would be abolished, metro Detroit remains one of the most segregated metros in the U.S. Attitudes change, but socioeconomic progress is intentional and, apparently, slow.
Reply Retweet Like