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Dustin P. Walsh
Senior reporter for covering economic issues, big and small. Infographics and data. Known curmudgeon, alleged vampire.
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Dustin P. Walsh retweeted
NationalParkService 2h
John Muir was born on this day in 1838. As one of America’s most famous naturalist and conservationist, Muir fought to protect the wild places he loved, places we can still visit today. On this first day of National Park Week, share your favorite Muir quote!
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Dustin P. Walsh 19h
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Dustin P. Walsh 19h
Then why, I ask, am I not running the free world?
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Dustin P. Walsh 23h
Replying to @nickrmanes
Well, I'm stoked to be on your radar.
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Dustin P. Walsh 23h
Replying to @nickrmanes
Don't be such a hipster, Manes.
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Dustin P. Walsh 23h
If I may be blunt. Today and everyday, delivers high-quality journalism. We've blown out the competition, blazed new paths on reporting and are burning to hash out more business news always. Do yourself a favor and become a member.
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @NRO
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @johnmoz
Couldn't agree more.
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @accfanto
Keep reading the thread, my man.
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
These may not make welfare programs cheaper in the short run, but they are designed to incentivize work. Right now, the going is good and that's when progressive policies like affordable child care, wage subsidies, etc. need to be tackled. /END
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
So while tax cuts are a big "stimulus" (short term and questionable), progressive policy changes that spur labor force participation are becoming more and more critical. That also means thoughtful "entitlement" reform. Wage subsidies and housing vouchers play a role.
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
These are all big problems that are going to be exacerbated by the next recession (coming to an economy near you by 2020) and a nation that is getting older and having fewer babies. There will be more pressure to work, but with fewer people working. That stunts growth.
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
On the front of parental leave, the U.S. is shameful. EU employers must offer a minimum paid maternity leave of 14 weeks (many countries mandate for more). By contrast, the U.S. is the only developed country to have no national paid parental leave at all.
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @LindsayVanHulle
If you'd like to lean more about Michigan's shrinking workforce, check out my former colleague 's beautiful coverage here.
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
In Michigan, finding a way to reduce the costs of child care to the HHS' 10-percent-of-income guideline would boost labor force participation for women by 2 percent — theoretically putting 43,000 more women in Michigan into the labor force.
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
The government says guideline that child care is not affordable if it costs more than 10% of a family's income. In Michigan, infant care accounts for 16.5% of income in a family with a median household income of $59,940. = Only 26% of Michigan families can afford child care.
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
I covered here how child care costs are prohibitive and keeping women out of the labor force. Michigan is the 12th least-affordable state for infant care, which averages $9,882 annually, or $824 per month.
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
The IMF bluntly says this gap between the U.S. and Europe “can be attributed to the more supportive policy changes in Europe,” specifically affordable child care and paid parental leave.
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
Labor force participation for working age U.S. women (25-54) in the U.S. was 70% in 1985, compared to just 59% in Germany. Now, German women have entered the labor force quickly, with participation rates now at 83%. The U.S.? Only 74% as men continue to drop out.
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Dustin P. Walsh Apr 19
Replying to @dustinpwalsh
But men are not growing in labor force participation across most wealthy nations - again, automation and non-human productivity gains play a major role in this. But where the U.S. is losing is that women in the EU have picked up the slack where men are dropping.
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