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Dunkirk1940 Museum
Official profile of the Dunkirk 1940 Museum based at Fort Luton, Chatham Kent. Dedicated to the full and real events of 1939-1940.
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Dunkirk1940 Museum retweeted
Look Up London 18h
Inside Aldwych's Ghost Station. It didn't thrive as a station, but still proved very useful! Read more:
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Dunkirk1940 Museum retweeted
BBC News (UK) Jul 15
Alan Turing revealed as the new face of the Bank of England's £50 note The computer pioneer is celebrated for his code-cracking work that proved vital in World War Two
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 13
Today we completed another part of our planned works. This, with some other advancements can be viewed on next weekend (A week today, 10-4 and again same times on the Sunday!)
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 13
Inspection signature of a worker from MAS. signed in March 1940 during , when our SP 36 filter was conducted.
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 12
Fly past of a Spitfire to mark the time when F/O McKinlay crashed in 1944
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 12
TBH, never seen one other than with the monopod as per the example we have with us here.
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 12
Compared to the Boys yes. A lot more effective, which is the bit that matters.
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 12
First outing, for our loaned exhibit. As we have a Boys AT gun, we were delighted to have the chance to borrow this PIAT. Round on loan for today from
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 12
Replying to @249sqn
Also with
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 12
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 11
Off to for a day of remembrance
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 11
Replying to @Dunkirk1940M
As with previous model, the handle is offset to allow for two cans to be carried in each hand.
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 11
Another of our recent finds: A 2nd pattern MG ammo box from late . Found in a flea market, again in the heart of the battlefields, it is designed to minimise the possibility of dirt contamination on the ammo belt.
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 11
Replying to @SeaSpitfires
I should add that until the 1980's there was still a Bailey bridge at the Limburg-Marckolsheim crossing over the Rhine, part of which is now preserved at the Maginot Memorial in Marckolsheim.
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 11
Replying to @SeaSpitfires
From what I recall from the article, the entire impetus behind this was French. However, the name from what I understand comes from the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the town, when it was finally acknowledged for being what it is.
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 11
Replying to @SeaSpitfires
From memory, they were moved there around 1946. I have read an article saying they came from the wreaked American Mulberry, though the commemoration stone at the bridge claims it to have come from the British one, thus making a mockery of its name.
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 11
Replying to @SeaSpitfires
As with all such 'vital' crossings, life has moved on and hence it is now semi abandoned in a rural backwater. Poor maintenance has seen it reduced to foot traffic only and even that is likely to be stopped too at some near future point.
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 11
Replying to @SeaSpitfires
They were moved from Normandy to replace a vital river crossing, blown up by the retreating Germans over the L'Ill near Colmar. There are a number of them employed in such use in Eastern France.
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 11
Replying to @Dunkirk1940M
Found in a flea market in the heart of the Battle of the Pocket of combat area, it is impossible to say if the contents were consumed by troops of civilians.
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Dunkirk1940 Museum Jul 11
Another one of our recent finds. An American 'C' Ration issue crate. As can be seen from the photograph, clear instructions count for nothing, with the crate opened at the 'wrong' end. It could represent an urgent need for the contents.
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