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IrishPhilosophy 8 Dec 18
The Immaculate Conception is a religious dogma that confuses many. It became dogma in the 16th century, a "pious" opinion supported by the Spanish Crown and argued for by Irish Franciscans
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Dr Anne Marie D'Arcy 8 Dec 18
Replying to @IrishPhilosophy
Interesting read, thanks! Just two things, the concept of the Immaculate Conception is English in origin, dating back to the turn of the eleventh century, and in due course, excoriated by Bernard of Clairvaux as an English figary; it didn't become dogma until 1854.
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IrishPhilosophy 8 Dec 18
Replying to @dramdarcy
Interesting, thanks! Will amend when I get a chance.
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Dr Anne Marie D'Arcy 8 Dec 18
Replying to @IrishPhilosophy
I'll send on the references to Bernard, when I get a chance; his most virulent repudiation of the Immaculate Conception comes in one of his letters to the Canons of Lyons. I have a 22,000 word article on Chaucer's 'ABC' and the IC ready to go, but it won't go until after REF.
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IrishPhilosophy 9 Dec 18
Replying to @dramdarcy
Bernard certainly didn't mince words, did he? Thanks so much! Sounds a fascinating article - interesting to uncover just how Catholic pre-Reformation England was.
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Dr Anne Marie D'Arcy
C.1030-57: Feast of the Conception of Mary celebrated in England but may have originated in East via Ireland; 1066: feast suppressed in England by the Normans but celebrated in Ireland; 1128: feast restored in England; 1138: Bernard of Clairvaux denounces Immaculate Conception.
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Dr Anne Marie D'Arcy 9 Dec 18
Replying to @IrishPhilosophy
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Dr Francis Young 9 Dec 18
Have you read Antonia Gransden's article on the revival of the feast in 12th-century Bury St Edmunds?
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Dr Francis Young 9 Dec 18
If the Immaculate Conception is an Eastern idea, it's no longer accepted by the Orthodox churches - this is one of the many sticking points of Catholic-Orthodox unity
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