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Ross Douthat
New York Times columnist, National Review film critic, author of To Change the Church: Pope Francis and the Future of Catholicism (Simon and Schuster, 2018).
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Ross Douthat 12s
Replying to @IChotiner
Sure, liberals have never ended up defending a major political figure on their side because they decided conservatives were out to get him and breaking all the rules to do so.
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Ross Douthat 3m
My feeling at the moment is that the New Yorker story is a brilliant play by liberals to get conservatives to stick with a nominee when they should be open to having him withdraw. (Even more brilliant to add Avenatti to the mix.)
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Ross Douthat 7m
Replying to @willwilkinson
Doesn't mean it's not true. But still seems like something that could reasonably trouble men in public service in a polarized environment.
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Ross Douthat 10m
Replying to @willwilkinson
It's an accusation the woman herself concedes is less-than-reliable, the authors concede was brought forward because partisans went looking for stories like it and the woman felt pressured into offering it, and it clearly fell short of normal newspaper standards for publication.
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Ross Douthat 13m
Replying to @willwilkinson
Will, do you find the way that the New Yorker accusation has been surfaced at all troubling as a precedent for high-stakes appointments?
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Ross Douthat 17m
Replying to @ConnollyDC
I think secularization on the left would have still eroded the possibility for such a party. But not in quite the same aggressive way.
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Ross Douthat 19m
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Ross Douthat 21m
Replying to @DouthatNYT
You'd still have some of the same breakdowns and derangements, but America's distinctive kind of ideological sorting-out was not by any means predictable from the vantage point of 1970 or 1975.
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Ross Douthat 24m
I don't think partisan polarization gets as bad without Roe, tbh, because you don't necessarily have the same kind of partisan sorting based on religiosity, which accelerates polarization by theologizing it.
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Ross Douthat 32m
Congratulations to Noel Francisco on his exciting new job!
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Ross Douthat 34m
Replying to @KevinWGlass
That's true too.
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Ross Douthat 35m
Replying to @mattyglesias
The Miranda ruling, to pick an example, was super-controversial when it happened. But it didn't poison the nominating process, and when later conservative courts upheld it in modified form there wasn't a huge fury on the right.
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Ross Douthat 38m
Replying to @mattyglesias
The entire Warren Court was unpopular with conservatives and contributed to a push for more conservative nominees. But the eventual collapse of the nomination *process* happens because of Roe.
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Ross Douthat 43m
Since there is nothing more frustrating than publishing a fine book that is not about the media obsession of the moment, please read this review of 's new immigration book and then go buy yourself a copy:
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Ross Douthat 49m
Replying to @mattyglesias
More that Brown shows that judicial activism can work out okay if it correctly anticipates an emerging consensus; Roe shows what happens when it doesn't.
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Ross Douthat 54m
Replying to @DouthatNYT
You can believe Roe was morally just and good public policy if you want. But the entire deterioration since, from Bork to Estrada to Garland to Kavanaugh, is clearly rooted in the judicialization of the central battle in the culture war.
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Ross Douthat 57m
The legitimacy crisis started in 1973.
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Ross Douthat 1h
Seems odd then that neither the New Yorker nor my newspaper could get any of these Yalies (save one, secondhand) to confirm the story.
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Ross Douthat 2h
Replying to @DouthatNYT
What a mess.
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Ross Douthat 2h
Replying to @DouthatNYT
Best-case scenario politically for GOP might be to hold the vote and have Collins and Murkowski vote BK down while also agreeing to support an equally or more conservative follow-up nominee. But it's not clear to me that they would agree to play that part.
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