Twitter | Search | |
Dave Ceddia
Contrarian idea: JS doesn't move too fast. It's fine. There isn't really a new framework (that matters) every 3 weeks. Once you've got the fundamentals you're good for a while. The language is solid. A few opt-in changes each year. Everything is fine.
Reply Retweet Like More
Dave Ceddia Sep 3
Replying to @dceddia
There is still a lot to learn if you're new to it all! I don't want to downplay that. But the fear that your knowledge will be invalid next week is just that: Fear. Feelings, not reality. It's a popular and oft-shared fear, but it's still not reality.
Reply Retweet Like
Dave Ceddia Sep 3
Replying to @dceddia
There's always new stuff coming out. Always new innovations. That doesn't mean you have to keep up with all of it. You can ignore it, and keep doing what works. Learn + use the fundamentals. The customers don't care, honestly, as long as it works :)
Reply Retweet Like
Dave Ceddia Sep 3
Replying to @dceddia
How do you know when a new thing is important, though? Wait a little while. Despite the popular trope of "overnight success," most overnight successes take *years* to get there. Give it a few weeks, or a few months. If the thing still seems popular + growing, check it out.
Reply Retweet Like
Dave Ceddia Sep 3
Replying to @dceddia
It's a bit like the stock market. After it crashes -- for MONTHS after it crashes -- everyone is afraid of another drop. This remains true even after the market starts going back up. Even when the upward trend continues for months.
Reply Retweet Like
Dave Ceddia Sep 3
Replying to @dceddia
Public perception is a lagging indicator. By the time a thing gains critical mass, you will know about it, and it will stay there for a while before something else replaces it. Then, people will predict its death long before it actually dies (ahem: Redux).
Reply Retweet Like
Dave Ceddia Sep 3
Replying to @dceddia
So yeah: keep a pulse on what's going on (JavaScript Weekly is great for that: ), but don't treat it like an ever-growing TODO list of new tech to learn. Treat it like a newspaper. Did anything big or life-changing happen this week? No? Back to work then :)
Reply Retweet Like
Mark Erikson Sep 3
Replying to @dceddia
:/
Reply Retweet Like
Dave Ceddia Sep 3
Replying to @acemarke
But, the new Context API! 😄
Reply Retweet Like
Alex Korban Sep 3
Replying to @dceddia
As a heuristic for learning, definitely. There's also another issue (both w/ Node & browser) that if I come back to a project after 3 months, a large portion of the dependencies have changed, and I have to do a lot of work to understand what changed and how. The churn is real.
Reply Retweet Like
Dave Ceddia Sep 3
Replying to @alexkorban
Yeah, definitely. I don't think that's unique to JS though. Bit rot is totally a thing, in this here modern age of downloading dependencies from the internet 😂 JS does seem especially susceptible though, with the huge dependency trees. Yay lockfiles?
Reply Retweet Like
Ryan Chenkie Sep 3
Replying to @dceddia
I feel like the pace of hot-new-js libs being released has slowed in recent years, at least on the framework side. things seem to be stabilizing.
Reply Retweet Like
Dave Ceddia Sep 3
Replying to @ryanchenkie
Yeah it feels that way.
Reply Retweet Like
Dan Burzo Sep 4
Replying to @dceddia
So I guess I'm just more cautious now about the bandwagons I decide to jump on.
Reply Retweet Like
Dave Ceddia Sep 4
Replying to @danburzo
Yeah, nothing lasts forever. It's great and it's terrible 😅
Reply Retweet Like
Nate Hopkins Sep 4
Replying to @dceddia
Reply Retweet Like
Dave Ceddia Sep 4
Replying to @hopsoft
I WAS SO TEMPTED TO PUT THAT IN
Reply Retweet Like
Greg Wild Sep 4
Replying to @dceddia
My view is that it stabilized when React hit the scene. Vue and Angular are viable alternatives. There are some "nice to know" libraries with specific roles. Component based web UI really helped stabilize the churn.
Reply Retweet Like
Dave Ceddia Sep 4
Replying to @GregJWild
Yep it seems like we're entering a period of relative stability with Components
Reply Retweet Like
Paul Henschel Sep 4
We went from string templates & OOP controllers with DI bridging to ui=fn(state), which was a major paradigm change. I think the next generation will probably take out the last OOP left-overs out, though i do think react will itself take care of it. Their future RFCs call for it.
Reply Retweet Like