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DBWRF
Dawoodi Bohra Women for Religious Freedom (DBWRF) has been formed to give voice to mainstream DBwomen. The time has come to stand up & be counted!
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DBWRF Mar 21
This World Poetry Day, bring out your inner poet and write magical verses that will touch a million hearts! Rules: 1) Submit your original work using and 2) Tag in your post Contest ends on 25th March.
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DBWRF Mar 20
On the occasion of , our children took the onus of spreading cheer and happiness with the less fortunate ones. A toy donation campaign was organised at various locations across the country, with a single motto of "spreading smiles".
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DBWRF Mar 12
At the age of 53, Zainub exuberates the energy and passion that would shame a millennial. Her hand painted porcelain crockery and block printed garments adorn the homes and offices of those with a taste for the finer things in life. 
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DBWRF Mar 10
In a community where family forms the nucleus of society and women are the centre of that nucleus, it is thrilling to see a family that is running a business and a home together. Read on to know more about the mother - sister trio:
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DBWRF Mar 9
From working as a scientist in the Indian Defence Ministry, to building an IT company which has been profitable since day one, her's has been a true story of resilience and passion! Read on to know more:
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DBWRF retweeted
The Dawoodi Bohras Mar 8
On International Women’s Day the community celebrates the achievements of Bohra women the world over.
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DBWRF Mar 8
So let’s raise our voices to celebrate the spirit of womanhood, to be a symbol of bravery, and together create a world of equality and
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DBWRF Mar 7
"Never give up, and you'll see your dreams come true." says Dr. Najmi who talks about her journey from setting up a high school with a handful of students, to setting up an internationally affiliated school in Surat. Read more:
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DBWRF Mar 6
She began designing ridas as a hobby. Her husband and brother gave her financial guidance and helped her scale the business, from a small 8x12 feet shop, to a three-storey boutique in the heart of Surat. Read on to know more:
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DBWRF Mar 5
What do over 5000 women have in common? They are bound by common threads - Happy Threads by Supermoms! Gainfully employing women from the community who are highly skilled in the art of weaving and crotchet, to create works of art. More here:
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DBWRF Feb 21
Would any mother inflict anything harmful upon her own daughter? No! FC is safe and a harmless religious and cultural practise.
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DBWRF Feb 19
Does a democratic nation allow only certain members to enjoy their right to freedom? NO! Then why is the going unheard and is not allowed their right to practise their religion?
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DBWRF Feb 18
Replying to @bohrabohra2
(..2/2) hesitant, hence there is no question about the practice being unethical.
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DBWRF Feb 18
Replying to @bohrabohra2
No one is forced to undergo khafz. It is a decision parents take for their child's spiritual well-being, just as they make several other decisions wrt vaccinations and the likes. Our trained medical practitioners are also instructed not to carry out khafz if the child is (1/2)
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DBWRF Feb 18
Replying to @Pallabiii
It is respected. Our trained medical practitioners have been instructed not to carry out khafz if the child is hesitant. We are happy to clear any more doubts to highlight how .
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DBWRF Feb 17
Replying to @dbwrf
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DBWRF Feb 17
Would anyone in their right state of mind, invade the privacy of their neighbours? No! Undergoing Khafz / FC is a private matter and no one ever bothers to inquire about it, and the question of treating anyone differently doesn't even arise.
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DBWRF Feb 16
Can a community that fosters gender equality, ever indulge in a harmful practice? No! Dawoodi Bohras are peace-loving and don't inflict any harm to their community members.
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DBWRF Feb 15
One's religion forms an integral part of their identity. If my religion advocated harming young girls, would I ever choose to follow it? No! My religion doesn't mean any harm to children.
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DBWRF Feb 14
Dawoodi Bohra women are well-educated and belong to a community having a high literacy rate. Would an educated, independent woman choose a practice that is harmful? No! is harmless.
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