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Dr. David Ludwig
Physician, Nutrition Researcher, and Public Health Advocate. #1 NY Times bestselling author of ALWAYS HUNGRY? and cookbook ALWAYS DELICIOUS
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Dr. David Ludwig 11h
Does breakfast skipping cause stroke, per an observational study making the rounds? Fasting may adversely affect those with metabolic dysfunction BUT: 👉Bkfst skippers were less healthy (hard to control fully) 👉Rarely having bkfst not associated with risk
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 21
Replying to @TomDNaughton
Or an actual carbon copy (not a “cc”)
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 19
What if the doctor (to be) has diabetes? 👉Patients benefit . . . and so do other doctors Full free text of this compelling story available
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 19
Here's the beaut from the National Diabetes Prevention Program. (Turns out processed grains are associated with increased diabetes risk, whereas nuts/legumes appear protective).
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 19
Great to see a Consensus Report on diabetes involving an actual consensus of diverse experts. As one of several options, very-low-carb diets: 👉"among the most studied eating patterns" in T2DM 👉"shown to reduce A1C and the need for antihyperglycemic meds"
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 19
Replying to @irockthered
Sorry I can't provide personal advice on social media. We always suggest talking with your primary care about any specific health concerns. You can join our FB community for general support:
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 17
In a study of workplace wellness "resembling programs offered by US employers," there was NO improvement in health, costs or employment after 1.5 yr 👉Admittedly, behavior change is hard 👉Let's try new diet targets ("choose reduced-fat foods" – Table 2 ?)
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 13
Replying to @dekkaaah
Or just bullying the least powerful in the academic pecking order
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 13
Replying to @dekkaaah
Yes, sexism could have played a role.
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 13
RIVETING ACCOUNT of scientific misconduct 40 years ago, with playing a key investigative role. Many familiar themes: 👉Ego 👉Excessive focus on "priority" 👉Senior faculty spread too thin 👉Too much pressure on junior faculty 👉Slippery slope from cutting corners to fraud
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 13
Replying to @DoctorTro
This could cut down on your twitter time 😂 Seriously, congrats! 👏
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 12
Replying to @BenBikmanPhD
A useful review, at least indirectly supporting the Carbohydrate-Insulin Model: 👉"Insulin translates unfavorable lifestyle into obesity" Curious, no mention of the dietary factor with dominant influence on insulin levels: 👉 Carbohydrate
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 11
Replying to @DylanMacKayPhD
Total daily insulin dose was substantially lower, an important covariate in interpreting HbA1c.
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 11
Replying to @AmandaZZ100
Total daily insulin dose was significantly lower on the low carb diet (33.6 vs 43.2 units, p<0.001). This improvement might lower cardiometabolic risk over time.
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 11
Small, cross-over study of 100 vs 250 g carbohydrate for type 1 diabetes. On low carb diet: 👉same HbA1c 👉less time with low blood glucose 👉less glycemic variability 👉lower body fatness 👉fewer drop-outs Need large trials of this unconventional approach
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 9
Not nefarious, but quite high glycemic load. Raises blood glucose more, calorie for calorie, than most other foods. People with diabetes on continuous glucose monitoring will typically see this.
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 8
Gives one the crazy idea that processed grains, potato products and concentrated sugars — by raising insulin so much — could promote more fat storage than lower glycemic load foods. 🤔
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 4
Replying to @jflier
It was like guerrilla warfare trying to block their spam, with frequently changing email addresses containing different variants of "omics"
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 3
An inverse association with estrogen isn't too surprising. The impact on health (fertility, breast cancer) will be more interesting . . . and of course harder to study.
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Dr. David Ludwig Apr 3
I'm not among those who think all observational studies are worthless. However, this is really very small, with limited ability to control for important confounders. Wouldn't take this to the bank.
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