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Dr. David Ludwig
Physician, Nutrition Researcher, and Public Health Advocate. #1 NY Times bestselling author of ALWAYS HUNGRY? and cookbook ALWAYS DELICIOUS
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Dr. David Ludwig 18h
For diet, one size doesn't fit all. Until we clarify the individual predictors of success, "N of 1" experiments can be helpful in the clinic. But in this thread, Speakman points out hazards of extrapolating to public recommendations. (And if you're into metabolism, follow him)👇
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Dr. David Ludwig Dec 8
Agreed, Jim. Nutrition research is easily polarized and the discourse further deteriorates on social media. We've addressed criticisms with the aim of scholarly debate and transparency on BMJ Rapid Response (see the chain of posts):
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Dr. David Ludwig Dec 6
A balanced review of a ketogenic diet to treat cancer ("molecular therapy"), by a leading oncologist . The cost to develop just one drug can be $1 billion. Time to invest in definitive clinical trials.
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Dr. David Ludwig Dec 6
Could the presence of cancer be detected in 10 minutes? The DNA of many tumors have characteristic "methylation" patterns – identifiable structural changes. The new test seems very sensitive. Key will be keeping "false positive" rates low.
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Dr. David Ludwig Dec 6
With calorie restriction, the intestinal track lining shrinks (to conserve calories). But story may not be so simple. According to a new review, when body fat stores decrease, the brain tells the gut to grow, in preparation for needed nourishment.
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Dr. David Ludwig Dec 4
HI Michael, The change was not done after unblinding, as per our post today. See especially last paragraph
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Dr. David Ludwig Dec 4
Replying to @DoctorTro @KevinH_PhD
Tro, we knew what people were fed (hard to do a double blind diet study for so long). The data were masked with regard to diet group assignment (ie, we were blinded in this regard). Only statistician had access to both primary outcome data and group assignment until publication.
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Dr. David Ludwig Dec 4
Replying to @YoniFreedhoff
Here's the rest of the post.
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Dr. David Ludwig Dec 2
Not exactly, but it sure beats a grudge match in a locked cage.
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Dr. David Ludwig Dec 1
We followed our final a priori analyses plan. Data are publicly available for you to reanalyze.
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Dr. David Ludwig Nov 29
Replying to @KevinH_PhD @DoctorTro
Tro, since prior study was cross-over, the timing of the anchor is irrelevant. Everyone is compared to his/her own baseline for each diet. New study is parallel design, which introduces inter-individual variation related to weight loss if one uses pre-weight loss point as anchor.
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Dr. David Ludwig Nov 29
Thanks for the kind words. We address in detail in the manuscript, which is freely available online. Scroll down to the discussion section:
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Dr. David Ludwig Nov 29
Our recent study on metabolic advantage of low-carbohydrate diets has provoked a rapidly evolving series of attacks from a few critics. Our latest response is online . 👉Bottom line: Do a weaker analysis, get a weaker result. 👉No big surprise.
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Dr. David Ludwig Nov 29
We respond to these factual distortions and aspersions at , linked here:
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Dr. David Ludwig Nov 29
Replying to @KevinH_PhD @bmj_latest
We response to these factual distortions and aspersions at BMJ Rapid Response, linked here:
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Dr. David Ludwig Nov 28
Final attempt, then will sign-off this discussion. These surveys are inherently cross-sectional. Admittedly, drop began before 1970, in part due to Am Heart Association recommendations and promotional campaigns. Data for low 40s% below. Data for low 30s% in 1990s easy to find.
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Dr. David Ludwig Nov 28
Replying to @DarioBressanini
Sadly, you're slowing catching up with us as your traditional diet is left behind.
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Dr. David Ludwig Nov 28
Dietary fat proportion: 1970: ≈ 42% (admittedly, some variability in estimates; references previously sent) 1990s: ≈ 32% Absolute decrease ≈10% Relative decrease ≈ 25% (Please don't oversimplify: main issue was massive influx of highly processed CHO)
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Dr. David Ludwig Nov 28
Remember these? Question is: Do they TASTE SO GOOD we just can't control ourselves? 👉If so, why don't French, Italians have more obesity on their tastier diet? Or do EFFECTS ON METABOLISM drive cravings/overeating, per this link?
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Dr. David Ludwig retweeted
HarvardPublicHealth Nov 27
"This study raises the possibility that a focus on restricting carbohydrates, rather than calories, may work better for long-term weight control." - via
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