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scripting.com
How do you feel about Microsoft becoming a Chrome browser platform? Does this mean Chrome becomes the web, or Microsoft becomes a mostly powerless Google developer? What does this mean for the future of the web?
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Jared Smith Dec 9
Replying to @davewiner
If you had told me 20 years ago that Microsoft was going to build its browser using its competitor’s technology... I just have a really bad feeling about this.
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Alain Paradis 🇨🇦 Dec 9
Replying to @davewiner
What is also troubling to me is that Chromium browsers will share data. I don’t want that, since my actual Chrome browser is logged into my Google account.
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Dino Fantozzi Dec 9
Replying to @davewiner @KevinCTofel
Sleipnir FTW!
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Ray Daly Dec 9
Replying to @davewiner
I need to take a closer look, but in general this is how tech goes. The lower level stuff in the stack becomes common as more is added above. In other words, browser engines are becoming like TCP/IP.
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Brian Fagioli Dec 9
Replying to @davewiner @KevinCTofel
I honestly think people are overreacting. EdgeHTML was a non-factor anyway. No war was lost. Microsoft wasn’t really a participant anyway.
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Don Park Dec 9
Replying to @davewiner
Can Microsoft protect its own interests? Yes. What just happened is Google letting a gorilla prance into its playroom.
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James van B 😨 Dec 9
Replying to @donpark @davewiner
Edited some text for a client website, who asked about 'Edge' compatibility. Had to ask her to spell it for me, no idea, does anyone use it?
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zwetan Dec 9
Replying to @davewiner
here my 2 cents MS may want to switch to the HTML renderer but maybe not the JS engine the same way ChakraCore is used for TypeScript (in vscode) and Node.js (node-chakracore) they could go with Chrome+Chackra vs Chrome+V8
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Jim Kopps Dec 9
Replying to @davewiner
It means progress towards a de facto standard. Google gets no unfair advantage from the open acceptance of a browser rendering engine. It is exactly the opposite of a silo. Microsoft's decision is a win for both consumers and developers. Better late than never.
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Don Park Dec 9
no one I know of. :-)
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John Evdemon Dec 9
Replying to @davewiner
I would have preferred Firefox over Chrome
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Pokemon Dec 9
Replying to @jaredwsmith @davewiner
Chromium is open source. Google didn’t make it. Stop talking out of your head. Google contributes the most to it. Doesn’t mean they made it.
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scripting.com Dec 9
Replying to @donpark
I'm less worried about Google and Microsoft and more about you and I and the open web.
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Walt Mosspuppet Dec 9
Replying to @davewiner
Considering the market share of Edge, this won’t impact the future of the web at all.
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Don Park Dec 9
Replying to @davewiner
Same here. Balance of power is darn useful and I'm just saying we haven't lost it...yet.
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Feld ✡️ Dec 9
Replying to @davewiner
Maybe MS is angling to let Google shoulder the antitrust burden/blame/lawsuits while Redmond plays catch-up?
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