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Dan Monfre
Founder of performance digital agency Black Beach , WWII Researcher , Former blogger and trampoline dunker
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Dan Monfre Dec 1
Replying to @DanMonfre
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Dan Monfre Dec 1
The Netflix effect has caused The Liberator, ’s 2013 book to sell out on Amazon: . Can’t even imagine what and Apple TV are going to do to sales of Donald Miller’s Masters of the Air.
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Dan Monfre Nov 14
This is what happens when you put in charge of your team’s strength and conditioning.
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Dan Monfre Oct 14
Sign up for Amazon Attribution and you can create URLs that track view-through sales data. You can create URLs for each platform or for each campaign/ad set/ad/etc.
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Dan Monfre Oct 12
I use for custom hardcover books. They have software you can download called Bookwright that makes creating a book from scanned images really easy:
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
Replying to @Bucks
Marty Conlon
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
My favorite story is a crew heading home with a damaged airplane. They lost altitude fast, so pilot ordered them to throw any excess weight that wasn’t bolted down out the door. One guy took the money out of his pocket & tossed it out the door & the crew roared in laughter. 💸13/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
Pilots many times finished all their missions earlier than their crewmembers, leaving each individual gunner to finish their last 5 or so missions as spare gunners on other crews. Guys with 30+ missions would get placed on a crew flying mission number 5, & they hated it. 12/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
The ten-day “flak leave” given at a crew’s midway point is also crucial in telling their story. One crew staying at a castle got so drunk they put on the decorative medieval armor adorning the hallways and stumbled around the grounds pretending to be knights. 11/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
The “relief tube” used while in flight has a lot of great stories. One crew told me their challenges in using it while at high altitudes since the urine would freeze in the tube or on another crew member’s window if the goer’s aim was poor. 10/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
There were usually 2-4 crews sharing a hut, so crew who made it through all their missions had to watch multiple crews cycle through their hut, some lost their lives, others quit under stress, others just finished their missions first. 9/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
The layout & action inside the Nissen hut is crucial in understanding their psyches. If a crew was presumed dead or missing, their items would all be packed up & readied for shipment back home. Crews making late arrivals would come back to a bed with their belongings boxed up. 8/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
The crew members would get 2 ounces of brandy after every mission. A lot of crews had guys who didn’t drink for various reasons, so many guys would collect the extra booze, bottle it up and sell it. 7/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
🐈 One crew complained of mice running over their bodies throughout the night while they slept. So they found a cat from a departing crew and used it in their Nissen hut to catch the mice. 🐁 6/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
🐕 These guys loved keeping pets in their bunks as mascots (mostly dogs & cats), and while some were passed from crew to crew, I know some airmen who snuck their pets home on troop ships after their tour of duty. 5/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
No one greeted them, said “how ya doin?”, or asked where they were from. Everyone just minded their business and mostly interacted with just the other 9 guys in his crew. It was a stark contrast to what arriving at a training base was like in the States just weeks earlier. 4/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
Arriving at their base in England for the first time is something that the vets all spoke of. They showed up in shiny new flight jackets, only to realize they now stood out among the experienced crews’ weathered jackets who walked past without a glance or hello. 3/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
✈️ For crews that had to fly new planes over to England as part of their transport, the pilots had to sign some sort of waiver to confirm they had received the plane, and the waiver listed a line item with actual cost of the B-17 on it. “One B-17: $1,000,000”. 2/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
I just wrote a book about the Eighth. Here is a thread of subplots, exposition, and other random ideas for you to pull from and fill any holes you have in your scripts, free of charge of course! 1/
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Dan Monfre Oct 7
Replying to @JasonAbbruzzese
Dances With Wolves 🐺
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