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Curt Carlson
CEO of SRI International to 2014: think Siri, HDTV, and the mouse. Now a professor teaching "Innovation for Impact" at WPI and Northeastern.
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Curt Carlson Sep 14
This is problematic. Innovation creates growth, prosperity, jobs, & resources for national security & social responsibility. We need more of it. What can be improved is the focus on delivering customer value. Value creation is the job of every professional, but few know how.
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Curt Carlson Sep 14
Replying to @johnvanreenen @cepr
The incentives built into free markets and competition work in a constructive way.
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Curt Carlson Sep 8
In CA we lead in poverty, homelessness, poor roads, fires from neglected forests, power outages, water shortages, and terrible K-2 schools, especially for black children who fail at record rates. And it is the most advantaged spot in the world. These are failures of leadership.
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Curt Carlson Sep 6
Okay Alex -- what is the one thing you learned today that everyone else has wrong.
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Curt Carlson Aug 30
#2. We have pointed out that value creation (the process of creating value) is best understood as a learning and creating activity in complex environments. "Active learning" from the education sciences describes the best practices.
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Curt Carlson Aug 30
#1 Steve Denning has been a leader in the movement to get managers to think about their primary job: creating value for their customers. It is a mindset that they all say they have but our work also proves that few actually have.
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Curt Carlson Aug 30
#3 My coming article, Innovation for Impact, in HBR describes why and how active learning applies to value creation and shows how it can improve all value creation methodologies. Our work at Northeastern and WPI universities are continuing research in this direction.
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Curt Carlson Aug 30
Replying to @Grepsul @rstraub46
This is a positive but small step. People are beginning to realize that "green" doesn't necessarily mean green. Solar cells & batteries have some nasty side impacts on the environment. Solutions have to be clean, cost-effective, and scale to the world. New atomic can do that.
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Curt Carlson Aug 29
Replying to @Agile_Biz
My upcoming HBR article will go into detail about these points. The methodology we describe, "Innovation for Impact" (i4i) is responsible for innovations such as HDTV and Siri, now on the iPhone.
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Curt Carlson Aug 29
Replying to @Agile_Biz
#9. Bottom line: 1. Business purpose: create & deliver customer and stakeholder value 2. A goal: deliver max value in min time with min resources 3. Value creation: a learning & creating process in complex environments 4. Best learning methodology: active learning.
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Curt Carlson Aug 29
Replying to @Agile_Biz
#8 The optimal network is where the right sources of information are connected to the value creation activity. Siri, for example, at different times needed access to roughly a dozen different technologies. So the network need be dynamic. Big companies are bad at that.
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Curt Carlson Aug 29
Replying to @Agile_Biz
7) The minimal team (I call them surgical-like teams) is almost always best because communication cost goes up exponentially with team size while productively goes up linearly. Big teams must be broken down into functional units.
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Curt Carlson Aug 29
Replying to @Agile_Biz
6) Not having staff understand the language of value creation (invention, innovation, value creation, value propositions, customer value) slows done collaboration and learning.
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Curt Carlson Aug 29
Replying to @Agile_Biz
#5 When you apply these principles you almost always end up use Steve's three laws (customer, network, small teams) but it captures other critical thoughts. For example, any barrier that limits learning is bad and must be eliminated.
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Curt Carlson Aug 29
Replying to @Agile_Biz
#4 4) The best learning, creation, and improving methods in complex environments is by the use of "active learning" from the educational sciences.
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Curt Carlson Aug 29
Replying to @Agile_Biz
#3 3) The value creation process is to deliver the maximum customer and stakeholder value in the minimum time and with minimum resources.
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Curt Carlson Aug 29
Replying to @Agile_Biz
#2 2) Value creation is the process of learning, creating, and improving in a complex environment.
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Curt Carlson Aug 29
Replying to @Agile_Biz
#1 I have often asked Steve the definition of Agile. I am not sure so rather, here is "Curt's Manifesto." 1) The purpose of business is to create and deliver value to customers while satisfying all other stakeholders.
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Curt Carlson Aug 29
This is true. In our work with over 500 teams, only 0-30% of what companies and R&D firms work on would have any value if completed. What is missing? Not entrepreneurship, those efforts are too often misplaced, it is value creation. The "how" of innovation.
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Curt Carlson Aug 29
What we find in most companies is a lack of a value creation system that can identify new important opportunities and then mitigate its risks before making a big bet. Asking the Board to do that work is impossible.
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