Twitter | Search | |
Siddharth Singh
Editor-at-Large former editor Tweets personal; retweets are not endorsements
5,874
Tweets
236
Following
1,239
Followers
Tweets
Siddharth Singh 54m
Replying to @shashankjaitely
That will be a very expensive proposition! More seriously all talk of abrogation of the Indus Water Treaty (IWT) is silly: The Eastern rivers are for India to use. In any case we’ve stuck to IWT even during wars.
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh 2h
Will be interesting to see how this is done. There is a barrage of sorts near Makhu in Punjab from where Sutlej flows into Pakistan. Maybe that will be shut. Water to J&K will require infrastructure. Cost?
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 19
Myanmar army and a crackdown of sorts on NSCN(K). Action/inaction against the insurgent group are complex and include constraints faced by Myanmar’s armed forces. More here:
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 19
Replying to @thakurkehaath
Massively so. Reminds me of coups in 1950s/60s. Those ops required careful planning though the number of moving parts were limited. Even then they were fraught with uncertainty. The world’s most populous democracy and a fiercely competitive political system?!?! I wanna believe!
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 19
Just saw some tweets on how JeM/ISI/Pak want Modi to win hence the mayhem in K. If one keeps aside intrinsic weirdness of the claim, the conditional probability calculation is remarkable. To keep control over event flow comes close to omnipotence. These analysts, I tell you...
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 19
Replying to @NMRatnam
Remains one of my favourite works. The book on Leviathan is very good as well.
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 19
Replying to @NMRatnam
What’s gng on? Looks like a Schmitt week.
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 19
For all the noise about retribution we need to pause and figure a tight fit between political and military objectives. Military planners need some room: time, political backing and shielding from “here and now” demands. No purpose in a military op unless these conditions are met.
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 19
Diplomacy is always a better option. But for it to work one needs credible partners willing to work, however difficult the circumstances. India does not have one in Pakistan.
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 18
Replying to @CafeEconomics @sidin
India never had fascist ideology in European sense. 1) a backward capitalist order in a colonial setting is far cry from the inter-war economic dislocation that destroyed democracy. 2) in terms of ideas we’ve never had anything close. Doesn’t prevent people stitching parallels.
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 18
Replying to @CafeEconomics
Right (e) is particularly interesting given contemporary discussion. Though personally I think right (d) is also interesting, for very different reasons.
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 14
This is a class addled to NAM era demarche-mallows followed by a debate at the UN.
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh retweeted
Abhijnan Rej Feb 14
Move within 48 hours, without warning, and seize a few small towns in Pak Punjab... And populate it with Indian armour. Let's see how Pak army then nukes it's own *Punjabi* population.
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh retweeted
Kunal Singh Feb 14
Deterrence is about who is being deterred. A window has existed but we have been deterred. A provocative point: If India really gets its act together on counterforce capabilities and missile defences, tactical nukes are rendered irrelevant. Cold Start becomes a real option then.
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 14
Replying to @d_extrovert
Am not sure whether we have the military means for counterforce or whether we are even psychologically prepared for it. We shy from even the most basic escalatory steps. And yes we’ve been cowered for a long time and I would not grace it by calling it “deterred.”
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 14
Q: What is the distance between a sub-nuclear option and the threshold at which Pakistan responds with tactical weapons such as its newly minted missiles. The window exists for sure but a lot depends on India’s estimate of it.
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 14
Replying to @AbhijnanRej
True. But India hardly ever reacts in military terms let alone an over-react. That said, the problem of calibration is for real. Let’s see...
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 14
Not really: in such matters taking the right step/being tough outweighs any political costs associated with signalling (the opposition’s claim about diversion etc). The issue is one of right targets and ability to hit them. I doubt if we can go as far as hit JeM in Bahawalpur.
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 12
Replying to @samanwaya_et
Congratulations!
Reply Retweet Like
Siddharth Singh Feb 7
“The fact that India can even contemplate cash transfers is a testimony to the giant strides made on the underlying financial architecture...” Excellent piece on the budget and fiscal prudence by Sajjid Chinoy in
Reply Retweet Like